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INTERNATIONAL HISTORY

Germany invades Austria.

Orson Wells broadcasts War of the Worlds.

VW Beetle created by Ferdinand Porsche.

The ballpoint pen in invented by Lazlo Biro

LOCAL HISTORY

Exports and Imports are allowed only with special licences.

February 26 - Summit Road opens

September 14 - Social Security Act passed. The cornerstone of the first Labour government's 'cradle to the grave' welfare policies, this act introduced revised pensions and extended benefits for families, invalids and the unemployed.


Credit: Ch-Ch City Libraries

RACING HISTORY

LAWN DERBY became the first horse outside the USA to break two minutes for the mile when he recorded 1:59.4 in a Time Trial during the Cup Carnival at Addington.

April 20 - First Inter-Dominion trotting Championship held at Addington Raceway. Originally scheduled for Easter, the contest was postponed by flooding throughout the city. Further flooding after the first races delayed the finals until May 4.



Credit: Ch-Ch City Libraries

RACING HISTORY SECRETARIES & EXECUTIVE STAFF

DES PARKER - NZMTC Secretary/Manager

Des Parker was associated with the Met for nearly 50 years and the Secretary/Manager from 1952 until his retirement in 1979. During that time he guided the club ably through a series of innovations and adjustments unknown in earlier eras.

He joined the Met in 1938 as a clerk under Andrew Rattray and his assistant, Harold Goggin, who succeeded Rattray in 1941 until his sudden death in 1952. Parker worked as a tote operator at the first New Zealand InterDominion in 1938 and retired at the end of organising the fifth Series held on the track, all hugely successful. During his time came several Royal visits including the most significant one by the young Queen and Duke in 1954 a test for the new Secretary which he passed with flying colours.

Major rebuilds, night trotting, the purchase of the Addington grounds previously leased, the adaption of caterers to reflect a new audience were just a few areas where he showed great competence. Few presidents had the appetite for a fight with Des Parker over some proposed change when he had reservations but few wanted to anyway. Aided by his "man's man" image he welcomed innovation but had a practical, realistic approach to his limits and woe betide the proposer, inside the office or out who had not prepared a very solid case for change.

Parker enjoyed racing but he was primarily an administrator and this gave balance to some of the more unwise proposals over the years. When he retired he was made a life member of all three clubs racing at Addington, only the second man in history to have that honour. He departed before the real start of the computer age and it would be fair to say he was the last of the great office administrators from the simpler "golden age".

Credit: David McCarthy writing in Harnessed Aug 2016

RACING HISTORY INTERDOMINIONS

CHRISTCHURCH - POT LUCK

Continuing and frustrating postponements through rain which dogged the carnival, a furore over a change of gear on the horse destined to become New Zealand's greatest sire and a clear-cut Championship win on poins for a famous mare despite going under in the Grand Final were memorable features of the first Interdominion Series in New Zealand - at Addington in 1938.

In common with Perth and Brisbane, trotting in Christchurch had in very early times been held on a cricket ground - at Lancaster Park from 1886 - by cricket enthusiasts to raise funds for their foremost love. About five years earlier Robert Wilkin had laid the foundation for the sport by importing from America the Kentucky-bred stallions Berlin and Blackwood Abdallah, the yearling colt Vancleve and six broodmares. The venue soon changed to Addington, where the New Zealand Metropolitan Trotting Club held the first meeting in November, 1899, with stakes totalling 2140 and investments 10,695. The first New Zealand Cup was run at Addington in 1904 (won by straightout trotter Monte Carlo) and by 1938 the Metropolitan Club was ready to stage New Zealand's first-ever four-day meeting for the Interdomions with total stakes of 9700 and a Grand Final purse of 2350.

Rain, badly affecting the six-furlong clay track, proved a nightmare for officials, forcing "the Met" to make four postponments during the carnival. Originally set down to start on Easter Saturday, April 16, the first set of heats were run on Wednesday, April, 20. The second round was to have followed the day after, but was postponed twice until the Saturday, while the third day was held on Tuesday, April 26. Then the Final had to be put of from the following Saturday until Wednesday, May 4. Scheduled to be run over eight days, from April 16 to 23, the meeting wound up extending over a fortnight.

But, despite these upsets, all the ingredients were there for some splendid racing, with a good selection of worthy visitors from Australia to measure strides with a vintage assortment of New Zealand's best. And the racing as it unfolded proved of the highest order. The 1936 and 1937 Grand Champions Evicus and Dan's Son were both on hand from Australia, not to mention Icevus (a well-performed brother of Evicus), J P Stratton's Kolect, Melbourne-trained Joy's John (third in the Adelaide Grand Final a year earlier) and the gallant West Australian mare Lady Childewood.

Such was the strength of the New Zealand force, however, that of these only Evicus (who after finishing last in the Adelaide Grand Final had been trained in New Zealand for some time) made the Final, in which she was never in contention. Points were allotted in the heats on the basis of 6 for first, 2 1/2 for second, 1 for third and 2 1/2 for fastest time of the first four home. The allotment in the Final was 7, 2 1/2, 1 and 3.

First blood in the 10-furlong round went to the bonny four-year-old mare Parisienne, who in the deft hands of trainer Roy Berry started from 12yds and came from the back in slow going to beat Evicus (12yds) by two lengths with favourite King's Play (12) next, then Roi l'Or, hero of a hundred battles, fourth from 36yds.

The second heat was affected by accidents, and 1937 NZ Cup winner Lucky Jack (who was to win the Cup again in 1939 after finishing second in 1938) was among those put out of contention. The winner was Ces Donald's candidate Plutus by two lengths over Joy's John (George Gath).

Supertax, a fine pacer of the era for George Mouritz, came off 36yds to beat Blair Athol (Fr) and Ladt Childewood (12yds) in the remaining heat. Here John McKenzie's American import U Scott, a ruling favourite, made a hopelessmess of the start before catching the field, running upo to third on the turn then wilting out.

Supertax and Parisienne moved well ahead on the points table with 17 apiece following clear wins at a mile and a half on a holding but drying track on the second day. Pot Luck, no danger on the opening day, was runner-up to Supertax in the hands of Maurice Holmes, while smart Auckland visitor Nervie's Last (F J Smith) with 12yds start from Parisienne, failed by half a length to hold her out, with Evicus a good third. Lucky Jack won the other heat for Roy Berry by a neck from Blair Athol.

The going was similar for the two-mile heats the third day, and again Parisienne and Lucky Jack prevailed, but, to the ire of many in the crowd, the third heat, the final event of the day, provided an all-the-way win for the Free Holmes-driven U Scott over Pot Luck and Supertax.

After U Scott had badly muffed his starts on the first two days, owner John McKenzie (later Sir John) has sought permission on the third day to race the horse in a closed bridle instead of an open one. Mr McKenzie ordered U Scott back to the stalls and threatened to scratch the horse when refused this request by chief stipendiary steward Fred Beer and the judicial committee. Under the rules of the day, a horse that started more than once at a meeting was required to wear exactly the same gear unless the express consent of the stewards was given for a change. The stewards reconsidered; U Scott made a late appearance on the track and won. He was greeted with a hostile reception, mainly from people who had altered their choice of bets under the impression that he would be scratched.

A protest by the Pot Luck camp against U Scott was dismissed after dividends were held up until the following day. It cost Mr McKenzie the winning stake of 525. He had stipulated he would pay this amount to the Returned Services Association if the stakes were awarded to him. U Scott got 100 of that back by taking the lap prize awarded to the first horse past the winning post the second time round with six furlongs to go in the Grand Final. But after leading to the straight he was under pressure and dropped out.

He was a good racehorse, however, and his 11 wins and six placings from 30 starts in New Zealand as a pacer after taking a matinee mark of 2.11 trotting at two years in America, earned him, in days of microscopic stakes, 2055. This was nothing to what he was to accomplish as a sire and broodmare sire, however, and today the son of Scotland and Lillian Hilta is famous throughout the trotting world for his accomplishments at stud.

Roy Berry had to choose between his stablemates Parisienne (top points scorer with 23) and Lucky Jack (second equal in the table with Supertax on 17) as his charge in the Final. He opted for Parisienne. Plutus and U Scott (8 1/2) were next on the points table ending the qualifying heats, at which stage Pot Luck - a wayward type and hard to manage, so that the early slow pace in the heats had told on him - had only 5 points.

A great crowd turned out despite the overcast weather, and on a good track the whole Grand Final field of twelve went off correctly. U Scott, on reaching the front fairly early, set a muddling pace before sprinting up for the lap prize. At this stage Parisienne, squeezed back early, began moving up from second-last. She had the crowd on its toes as she chased U Scott and Nervie's Last (Jimmy Bryce Jnr) into the straight. However, just when it appeared this grand mare was on her way to a clean sweep of the series, Pot Luck - shuffled around in the race but cleverly and patiently handled by Morrie Holmes - pulled out and with a brilliant final spurt outsprinted Parisienne to the line by two lengths. Stan Edwards with Blair Athol was third, only a head from Parisienne, with Jack Pringle and Supertax next, just ahead of Lucky Jack. The last-named, in the hands of Lester Frost had been badly checked near the three furlongs when travelling like a winner. Parisienne was a clear-cut Championship winner with 28 1/2 points over Supertax (18), Lucky Jack (17) and Pot Luck (12).

Bred in Auckland by George McMillan and raced by Mrs D R Revell, Parisienne was by the imported American horse Rey de Oro. Her sire had topped the New Zealand sire's list in the two previous seasons and was also to subsequently twice top the broodmares sires' list. Her dam, Yenot, by the imported Harold Dillon from a mare by the famous Rothschild, was a fair performer who won saddle races in Westport and Greymouth. Yenot was to found a fine family, with the line through Parisienne (dam of the brilliant La Mignon, in turn the dam of Garcon Roux and Roydon Roux) the strongest branch.

Educated by one of New Zealand's best-ever jockeys, Hector Gray, before being handed to Berry, the handsome chestnut Parisienne, 15.1 hands, won the Sapling Stakes at two and at three the New Zealand and Great Northern Derbies. Following her Championship win she in 1939 became world's champion pacing mare with a race record of 4:15.6 for two miles. When she embarked on her equally successful stud career her racing record stood at 16 wins, 10 seconds, four thirds and two fourths and 6766 in stakes. She was widely acclaimed the greatest of her sex to have raced in New Zealand as a four-year-old, and one of the top mares of all time.

Pot Luck, a sturdy five-year-old son of the imported Walter Direct horse Jack Potts (nine times New Zealand's leading sire and six times leading broodmare sire) and the Harold Dillon (imp) mare Hope Dillon, was trained and driven by the then 29-year-old Maurice Holmes for another capable horseman Bert Stafford, then publican at the Carlton Hotel in Christchurch. Stafford, long a trotting dabbler, had bought Pot Luck for 400 from New Brighton breeder J D Smith after the gelding had finished second in the Riccarton Stakes as a three-year-old. While still three Pot Luck carried on to win six races for Mr Stafford, including the inaugural All-Aged Stakes at Ashburton. He was later to win a Wellington Cup and had 18 wins and 33 placings worth 8092 on the scoreboard when retired as a nine-year-old. Ironically, Pot Luck was ninth on the score table with 12 points after winning the Grand Final.

The heats carried stakes of 750 (525 to the winner) and the Final was worth 2250, of which Pot Luck collected 1500. Parisienne received 450 and also 250 for the highest aggregate of time points, which with her heat wins boosted her earnings to about 1800 -roughly the same as Pot Luck's full share of the spoils.

Australians Joy's John (Victoria) and Lady Childewood (Western Australia) had gained a few qualifying points, but did not stay around for the last day of the meeting, when Joy's John would have been able to contest the Final.

The great Indianapolis, off the winning list since he won his third successive New Zealand Cup in 1936, took a consolation race from 60yds, with the crowd cheering the old favourite home, in the hands of Doug Watts. Lou Thomas won the other consolation with Glenrossie.

Credit: Ron Bisman & Taylor Strong in Interdominions the Saga of Champions

RACING HISTORY HORSES

LAWN DERBY

LAWN DERBY FIRST TO GO TWO MINUTE MILE

New Zealand saluted her first two-minute pacer last week when the tremendous crowd on the final day of the Cup meeting rose on its feet to give the Australian speed merchant, Lawn Derby, one of the greatest ovations in the history of the sport.

Lawn Derby's attempt against the record was regarded by many as little more than an exhibition of unhoppled pacing, but when he reached the end of the first quarter in 0.28 3/5 and the first half-mile in 0.57 3/5, the crowd began to get to its feet.

With six furlongs gone in 1.27 4/5 and the achievement of something never before seen outside America in sight, the Addington fans let loose in a truly amazing fashion.

Outside the demonstration winessed when Harold Logan won the Free-For-All in his "final appearance" two years ago there has never been a scene on Addington to compare with Lawn Derby's reception. The hoisting of 1.59 2/5 for the full journey was the signal for renewed outbursts, and the mobbing of horse, owner, and driver.

New Zealand has waited a long time for a horse capable of such speed, and last Friday will be a day that will never be forgotten for those fortunate enough to see Lawn Derby in action. Even had he failed in his objective, Lawn Derby would well have been worth going a long way to watch. A bright bay carrying plenty of quality, he is a pacer in every meaning of the word.

Boots, hopples and overcheck know no place in his wardrobe, and he moves with a precision that is attractive to an extreme. In short, he is the finished article, and he could not be improved upon as a pacer.

Conditions were as near to perfect as they could be on Friday, but given similar condition again there is little doubt that Lawn Derby would improve his 1.59 2/5.

Driver W J O'Shea was at a great disadvantage in that he is practically a stranger to the track and the various posts. The result was that his horse was asked for too great a speed in the first half-mile. The first four furlongs in 0.57 3/5 would have found most horses even of Lawn Derby's calibre, collapsing, and no greater proof of his wonderful speed and stamina could have been given than his final half in 1.1 4/5. More favourably rated, he would have reached, or bettered, 1.59.

The Aussie will now remain in New Zealand for several months, making a further attempt over a mile at New Brighton next month, and possibly at Epsom over the Auckland Cup fixture. He should be a wonderful attraction in both centres.

He is the greatest pacer ever seen in New Zealand or Australia and there is little need to say more than that.

Credit: NZ TRUTH 16 Nov 1938

RACING HISTORY HORSES

QUITE SURE

One of the more surprising successes at the stud in NZ was Quite Sure, a double-gaited horse imported her in 1938 by Miss Julia Cuff, then based in Southland. The Peter Volo stallion stood for some years in that province and his last years in Rakaia when Miss Cuff moved north.

Although most of his best offspring were trotters Quite Sure actually took his best lifetime mark of 2:01.8 pacing, though his sire, a son of Peter The Great, was a champion trotting stallion as a yearling and each season through to four years. Quite Sure's sons and daughters had mixed reputations but properly handled gave great results to patient trainers.

For a stallion whose offspring generally needed time to show their best, Quite Sure made an instant impact. From his first crop came 26 individual winners of 102 races. They included the juvenile champion Walter Moore, another top pacer Special Force and many others. The best known is the almost legendary Certissimus who, Even Speed and all, is probably the best young trotter this country has ever seen.

Certissimus had a tremendous action and in a tragically short career (he died from an accident as an early 4 year old) he became a wonder horse, returning one scintillating performance after another in the war years. Another champion trotter from the sire's early crops was Will Cary, the first trotter in NZ to better 4:20 for two miles and a Dominion Handicap winner.

Quite Sure's first winner was Bomber, trained by Bill Doyle at Leeston. Bomber went on to win a Dominion Handicap, and Bill has another cause to remember the stallion for he later leased and trained Gold Horizon. A lot of people will tell you that Gold Horizon's equal as a trotter is yet to be produced in NZ. He won more stakes than any other of his gait either here or in Australia at the time and won more than 20 races though the Dominion eluded him.

There were numerous other grand trotters by Quite Sure. Jimmy Dillon won 16 races and held two Australasian records. Blue Horizon was a mighty trotter, also holding records for some years, and he numbered the Ashburton Cup among his many wins. Then there was the brilliant, but unsound Toushay, holder of the 1 mile record for a number of years and winner of the Trotting Free For All. Sure Gift was another topliner and with Fairy Dell gave Quite Sure wins in the Trotting Stakes.
Ripcord was another champion trotter by Quite Sure, winning over all distances against top company and holder for a while of a world record over 11 furlongs. He won 11 races in all. Like another top trotter in Super Note, by Quite Sure he had some success at stud.

There were a number of other top horses by Quite Sure. Included among them were Copper Trail, a good Southland pacer and winner of the Gore Cup, Sandy Duval, Rerewaka (NZ Trotting FFA), Karnak (who beat a handicap field at two years), Stuart Lee (who won seven successive races), Imperial Trust, Monagh Leagh, Minora, Quite Happy and Quite Likely, holder of a two-year-old national mark over a mile for fillies. His best pacing son however was Whipster who won eight races until injury terminated his career. Whipster was a successful sire of Massacre, Don Hall and Glint among others.

Quite Sure also had considerable success as a broodmare sire. Quite Sound produced a top class trotter in Rock'n Robin. Glamour Girl was the dam of Flying Maiden and Halberg who won 15 races between them, Flying Maiden being the dam of current top three-year-old Cool Cat. Pleasure Bay is a Quite Sure mare assured of undying fame through her grandson Cardigan Bay. Ballyhaunis was the dam of Jennifer who has produced eight winners at stud and Sure Romance was the dam of Royal Mile, a juvenile trotter of great speed who held the national mile record for a time. Quite Evident, who won five races herself, was the dam of eight winners including Call Boy, who won nine including the Great Norther Derby, and Farlena an Australasian record holder and winner of four including the Sapling Stakes.

Little Doubt, a daughter of Quite Evident, produced six winners including For Certain, an Oaks winner. Maid Myra won five and was the dam of Pohutukawa, winner of 11 races in this country, and Cosy Del produced five winners and is grandam of Balgove. Karnak was the dam of five winners including Scimitar, winner of nine, and Ruer, who is the dam of the champion Australian trotter and sire Delvin Dancer. Credere was the dam of Deodatus, who won seven including the Trotting Stakes, and Salamis produced several winners including Sally Walla and Similas, the dam of Viking Water.

Luronne produced Ascot King a top Australian winner. Sporting Edition was the dam of Spring Edition, who won seven and produced five winners. Quite Contrary is the grandam of Ripper's Delight, Ilsa Voss and Rip Silver. Other good winners fron Quite Sure mares include the juvenile champion Vivanti (winner of the Oaks, Sapling Stakes, Welcome Stakes and holder of several records), Lassoloc winner of seven, Rascal five wins, Knighthood six wins (at either gait), Sure Charge winner of 11 (trotting), Dourglo, Prince Garry and April Hall, the dam of six winners.

Quite Sure sired 254 winners all told of 891 races and $705,749. In his second eligible season he was ninth on the list and remained in the top ten until 1954. His higest placing on the overall list was third in 1948-49, his offspring winning nearly $83,000. Other sons of Quite Sure made their mark at the stud including Desmond's Pride, a brother of Certissimus who himself served a few mares as a colt with success, Concord and Rest Assured.

Some trainers were not keen on Quite Sure's stock and Bill Doyle, who had more success with them than most explains why: "They could be very flighty and hard to handle," recalls the Leeston sportsman, "and didn't take kindly to harsh treatment. But once they were sorted out they were top horses and especially top stayers."

Credit: David McCarthy writing in NZ Trotguide 8Jun77

RACING HISTORY FEATURE RACE COMMENT

Alf Lawrence owner of Morello & Maurice McTigue
1938 NEW ZEALAND TROTTING CUP

Australia's two best pacers, Logan Derby and Lawn Derby, were on hand in 1938, but the latter was hardly a chance in a controversial 20-horse field from 60 yards.

The event proved a triumph on debut for Methven's Maurice McTigue, who shot along the rails with the moderately performed Morello, which he trained and drove for Mr A J Lawrence, to beat Lucky Jack and Logan Derby.

But it was the majestic Lawn Derby who stole the show at the meeting when on the last day, he time trialled in 1:59 2/5 to become the first 2:00 horse outside America.

Credit: New Zealand HRWeekly 8Oct03

RACING HISTORY FEATURE RACE COMMENT

1938 NEW ZEALAND FREE-FOR-ALL

For those who admire the genuine, solid and reliable racehorse, we can do no better than recommend Logan Derby. The Australian pacer is one of the safest and gamest yet introduced to Addington.

He was a good third in the New Zealand Cup, and there was merit in his placing in the Olivier Handicap, but his true worth was revealed on the last day, when he recorded 4.14 4/5 - a two-mile record for a horse - to fill second berth in the Louisson Handicap.

Later, he capped his performances by winning the Free-For-All in no undecided manner from the best Canterbury could produce against him. He ran his last mile here outside one horse all the way in 2.5 3/5 and fought on like a bulldog, to stamp himself a 24-carat racehorse.

A lazy goer, he has to be asked twice to turn on any speed, but he is a great beginner, will race anywhere in a field, and never makes a mistake in the running.

There was no prouder man in the country than owner Barnes after the Aussie's success in the Free-For-All and he had every right to feel elated. His horse is a model of the highest order.

Credit: NZ TRUTH 16 Nov 1938

RACING HISTORY FEATURE RACE COMMENT

1938 NEW ZEALAND TROTTING CUP

SMITHS QUICK THINKING PREVENTED HOLOCAUST IN TROTTING CUP

Another New Zealand Cup has come and gone and the latest, having much in common with its immediate predecessor, was one few would encore. It was not a race as we understand the word - just a mad scramble with ability in any department counting for little. Lady Luck was in full charge, and outstanding qualities in both horseflesh and horsemanship were wasted talents which could not be brought into play at any stage of the two mile journey.

Trouble started with the release of the barrier, when Rey Spec, Bonny Azure and Ginger Jack - a third of the limit horses - refused to get into action and caused more ducking and dodging than any debt collector ever did. In ordinary circumstances the field would have settled down quickly, but there could be no settling down here.

With 20 runners, all of which had to be within reasonable distance of the leaders, it was beyond all expectations that there would be any real order. Horses went where circumstances put them, and drivers were puppets. Some were given hopeless positions close, or comparatively close, to the inner rail; others were forced to commit their Cup hopes to the deep by being made the outside edge of the moving mass. Not that it mattered a great deal which was their lot. The programme committee's idea of a suitable limit had effectively removed all prospects of good judgement entering the question.

The few drivers who were placed where they could alter their positions were frightened to advance or retract and all had to stay where they found themselves. For the greater part of the journey they were like an uncomfortably packed collection of sardines waiting for someone to produce a tin opener.

As was only natural, this scrambling and crowded field could not go the full journey without an accident. At a stage when desperate positions called for desperate measures, Fred Smith met trouble which caused the inner wheel of Ironside's sulky to collapse. In "Truth's" opinion the club should present Fred with a gold medal. Had Fred attempted to stop his horse, as instinct must have prompted him to do, there seems little doubt that Addington racegoers would have witnessed one of the worst smashes in the history of the sport.

One of the leading division and third from the rails, Ironside was hemmed in with no chance of escape. The collapse of his wheel came when he could not go ahead, pull out or pull up. Fred took one look behind him - the New Zealand Cup field must have presented a pretty picture to him at that stage - and his course of action was decided for him. With his broken wheel ploughing up the track, Fred did his best to keep Ironside at full speed ahead. With the leaders going at 2.8 gait, full speed was impossible, but he slowed down sufficiently to allow the scrambling field to flow around and past him without disastrous interference to any. Had Ironside stopped suddenly or had he been allowed to take the swerve his broken wheel would natuarally tend to give him, the Addington officials would have had all the material on hand for a first-class nightmare.

It is to be hoped that with this incident came the awakening that the indescriminate preference for quantity of a questionable class over quality of an undeniable class cannot, and never will be, a sound or sane policy. The race from start to finish, could leave little room for debate on this question.

In spite of everything, there had to be a winner, and Morello emerged from this scramble the apple of Lady Luck's eye. And he deserved his victory. He went away well; did his work like a tradesman and when he was asked a question in the final quarter he came away in a manner that left little doubt that he was built of the right stuff to survive the day and the conditions. Always handily placed, he enjoyed no luck, either good or bad, in the running, and it has to be admitted that his finishing run carried the hallmark of class.

At the same time, he was fortunate that the conditions attached to the Cup allowed him, a pacer assessed on 4.27 when nominations closed, and one which had failed to prove his merit in numerous opportunities, to take his place in the field. He had done little to justify his inclusion here, and this is his seventh season of racing, but the result proved his connections had solid grounds for their faith in him when they accepted the Club's invitation to parade. Although there are people who will claim that Morello had no right in the field, the Club stretched its imagination and the conditions to attract horses not regarded as being in town-hall society, and all had an equal right to share in the spoils.

Lucky Jack was definitely unlucky not to have made this his second Cup. Like all the backmarkers, he was made to work overtime to get handy to the leaders, and he was forced to cover a ton of ground. When Ironside got in the wars, Lucky Jack was sent back, and he had to start all over again. He finished gamely, but the cards were stacked against him, and he had to be content with second money.

The Aussie, Logan Derby, acted the gentleman and ran a solid race for some of the minor money, while Ginger Jack came from an impossible position to have his number hoisted in fourth place. With a decent beginning it looked as if the latter must have been the winner. Pot Luck, another to begin slowly was right up, while Parisienne, pushed off the face of the earth all the journey, was next and far from disgraced. King's Play, Plutus, Rocks Ahead, Evicus and King's Warrior all went well to a point.

A break at the straight entrance cost Lawn Derby any chance he held. Up to that stage he had put in some great work from the back of the field and he looked like putting in a claim when he left his feet.

The hard luck stories that followed the Cup would fill columns, and none of them had to be invented. There could be nothing but hard luck for the majority of the runners in such a field.

As a race it was a failure, and as an indication of worth in horseflesh it was a farce.

Credit: NZ TRUTH 16 Nov 1938

CLUB HISTORY

DEVELOPMENT OF FACILITIES
In November 1938 a sub-committee of NZMTC and Canterbury Park waited on the Hospital Board for an extension of the lease.

RESULTS OF PRESTIGE RACES FOR THIS SEASON
 
NZ HAMBLETONIAN HCP TROT

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Two Miles Invitation Hcp Trot
Year: 1938

 
Race History
WINNER Not Held  
TRAINER DRIVER TIME
HANDICAP STAKE DATE 3/10/2007
BREEDING
OWNER
NEW BRIGHTON HANDICAP (NBTC)

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1904-09 2 Miles: 1910-11 1 1/2 Miles Re-named Brooklyn Hcp: 1912-28 2 Miles: 1929-35 Not Run: 1936-38 1 1/2 Miles: 1939-44 Not Run: 1945 2 Miles: 1946 1 5/8 Miles: 1947-49 2 Miles: Race Discontinued 1950
Raced between 1904 and 1949
Year: 1938

 
Race History
WINNER ICEVUS  
TRAINER J Young DRIVER R Young TIME 3 15 2/5
HANDICAP 24 yards STAKE 225 DATE 10/12/1938
BREEDING 6h Globe Derby-Milky Way
OWNER H Rudd
HENRY MACE MEMORIAL

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Handicap Pace: Run between 1902 & 1962
Year: 1938

 
Race History
WINNER GALLANT KNIGHT  
TRAINER F C Dunlevey DRIVER J Bryce Jnr TIME 4 25 1/5
HANDICAP Front STAKE 500 DATE 10/12/1938
BREEDING 8h Mr McElwyn-Etaday
OWNER J R McKenzie
LOUISSON HANDICAP

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Year: 1938

 
Race History
WINNER RENOWNS BEST  
TRAINER M Holmes DRIVER M Holmes TIME 4 17 3/5
HANDICAP Front STAKE 1000 DATE 11/11/1938
BREEDING 6m Grattan Loyal-Renown
OWNER Est F Fine
NEW ZEALAND FREE-FOR-ALL

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1982 on GROUP 1: 1950Metres: Mobile Start.
Year: 1938

 
Race History
WINNER LOGAN DERBY  
TRAINER H Barnes DRIVER J A Stamford TIME 2 39 2/5
HANDICAP Scr STAKE 500 DATE 11/11/1938
BREEDING h Globe Derby-Belle Logan
OWNER H Barnes
Last 800 Last 400 MileRate 2 07 3/5
MIDDLETON HANDICAP TROT

Current Sponsor:
Standing Start: 1903-1911 race open to pacers & trotters: 1911 in saddle. 2m 1902-3: 1 1/2m 1904: 2m 1905: 1 1/2m 1906-7: 2m 1908-30: 1 1/2m 1931-3: 2m 1934-38: 1 1/2m 1939: 2m 1940. Final running 1940
Year: 1938

 
Race History
WINNER LAMENT  
TRAINER W J Doyle DRIVER W J Doyle TIME 4 27 1/5
HANDICAP 24 yards STAKE 400 DATE 11/11/1938
BREEDING 7h Wrack-Echo
OWNER F E Graham
SOCKBURN HANDICAP TROT

Current Sponsor:
Standing Start. 1903 2miles; 1904-5 1 1/2 miles; 1906 2miles; 1907 1 1/2 miles; 1908-33 2miles; 1934-40 1 1/2 miles; 1941-46 1mile 5furlongs; 1947-50 1 1/4 miles stand FFA.
1903-1946: 1947-1950 Run as Sockburn FFA Trot
Year: 1938

 
Race History
WINNER WAHNOOKA  
TRAINER C S Donald DRIVER C S Donald TIME 3 16
HANDICAP 48 yards STAKE 400 DATE 10/11/1938
BREEDING 10g Peterwah-Ena Bell
OWNER Mrs E Berryman
NEW ZEALAND DERBY

Current Sponsor: ( DIAMOND CREEK FARM )
(Formerly New Brighton Derby Stakes) From 1914 to 1925 the race was conducted by the New Brighton Trotting Cub and decided in the Autumn (1925 Winner: Kohara). In 1925 it was taken over by the Metropolitan Trotting Club and decided in the Spring (Winner: Native Chief). 1982 decided in Summer. = Dead Heat. 1968-9 1 mile & half: 1970-2 1m 5f: 1973-83 2600 Metres Stand: From 1984 2600 Metres Mobile.
GROUP 1:Three-year-old Pace: 2600 Metres: Mobile Start.
Year: 1938

 
Race History
WINNER ALDERSHOT  
TRAINER M F Holmes DRIVER M F Holmes TIME 3 19 3/5
HANDICAP Scr STAKE 1,000 DATE 10/11/1938
BREEDING 3c Wrack-Trix Pointer
OWNER A J Nicoll
OLLIVIER HCP

Current Sponsor:
1935-49 Run as Handicap: 1950 Not Run: 1951-53 Two Mile FFA: 1954-55 One Mile & Half FFA: 1956 Two Mile Hcp: 1957-63 One Mile & Five Furlong Hcp: 1964-65 One Mile & Quarter Hcp: 1966-72 One Mile & Five Furlong Hcp: 1973-74 2000 Metres Hcp: 1975-76 1 Mile Mobile FFA: 1977-79 1 Mile Mobile Restricted FFA: Last run 1979
Year: 1938

 
Race History
WINNER PLUTUS  
TRAINER C S Donald DRIVER C S Donald TIME 4 23.0
HANDICAP Scr STAKE 1,000 DATE 10/11/1938
BREEDING h Nelson Derby-Fanny Logan
OWNER W J Gudsell
METROPOLITAN CHALLENGE STAKES

Current Sponsor:
2 miles 1901-4: 1 1/2 miles 1905-23: Not Run 1906: 2 miles 1924-36: 1 1/4 miles 1937-39: 1m 5f 1940: 2 miles 1941-42: 1 1/4 miles 1943: 1m 5f 1944-45: 1 1/4 miles 1946-63: 1m 5f 1964. From 1943 to 1963 restricted to 3&4yos: 1964 4yos only: Last run 1964
Handicap Pace: Run from 1901 to 1964: Open to 1942: For 3 & 4 yos 1943-63: 4 yos only 1964
Year: 1938

 
Race History
WINNER FINE ART  
TRAINER M C McTigue DRIVER M C McTigue TIME 2 41 3/5
HANDICAP Front STAKE 300 DATE 10/11/1938
BREEDING 6g Jack Potts
OWNER J F Grant
DOMINION TROTTING FFA

Current Sponsor: ( HARAS des TROTTEURS )
1911-1973 Distance Two Miles: 1934&1935 Distance One & Half Miles: = Dead Heat 2007- Free-For-All
GROUP 1: For Trotting Horses only 3200 metres
Year: 1938

 
Race History
WINNER Pilot Peter  
TRAINER R B Berry DRIVER R B Berry TIME 4 27.0
HANDICAP Scr STAKE 600 DATE 8/11/1938
BREEDING h Peterwah-Lady Bee
OWNER P J Andrew
RICCARTON STAKES

Current Sponsor:
1 1/2 miles 1935: 1 1/4 miles 1936-63: 1 1/2 miles 1964-71: 1 1/4 miles 1972: 2600 metres 1973-77. From 1964 run as seperate races on Tuesday & Friday of Cup Week
3yo Handicap Pace: Between 1964 & 1977 run as two races: Run from 1935 to 1977
Year: 1938

 
Race History
WINNER NELSON EDDY  
TRAINER D McKendry DRIVER D McKendry TIME 2 50.0
HANDICAP Front STAKE 300 DATE 8/11/1938
BREEDING c Nelson Derby-Lady Bee
OWNER P J Andrew
NEW ZEALAND TROTTING CUP

Current Sponsor: ( CHRISTCHURCH CASINO )
1904-1973 Two Miles: From 1929 to 1931 run as two Heats and a Final: 2008 Free-For-All
GROUP 1: 3200 Metres: Standing Start
Year: 1938

 
Race History
WINNER MORELLO  
TRAINER M C McTigue DRIVER M C McTigue TIME 4 19 4/5
HANDICAP Scr STAKE 2000 DATE 8/11/1938
BREEDING 9 g Rey De Oro - Moonlit
OWNER A J Lawrence
Last 800 Last 400 MileRate 2 10.0
CANTERBURY HANDICAP

Current Sponsor:
1938-52 2 Mile Std: 1953-58 1 5/8 Mile Std: 1959 2 Mile Std: 1960-72 1 5/8 Mile Std: 1973-81 2600m Std: 1982 2600m Mobile.
Handicap Pace: Run from 1938 to 1982
Year: 1938

 
Race History
WINNER GALLANT KNIGHT  
TRAINER F C Dunlevey DRIVER J Bryce Jnr TIME 4 25 1/5
HANDICAP 12 yards STAKE 750 DATE 8/11/1938
BREEDING 8h Mr McElwyn-Etaday
OWNER J R McKenzie
Last 800 Last 400 MileRate 4 12 3/5
LIGHTNING HANDICAP

Current Sponsor:
Standing Start: 1mile 1904-18; 1 1/2miles 1919; 1mile 1920-31; 1 1/2miles 1932-36; 1 1/4miles 1937; 1 1/2miles 1938-40; 2miles 1941; Not run 1942; 1 1/4miles 1943-61; 9 1/2furlongs 1962; 1 1/4miles 1963-72; Not run 1973&4; 2000metres 1975-82. In saddle 1904, 1909-11, 1920-31. Run as FFA 1947, 52, 59, 62, 63 & 1965
From 1904 to 1982
Year: 1938

 
Race History
WINNER DONOR  
TRAINER M F Holmes DRIVER M F Holmes TIME 3 16 3/5
HANDICAP 12 yards STAKE 300 DATE 12/08/1938
BREEDING 6g Jack Potts-Lady Bountiful
OWNER LM Gaskell
NATIONAL HCP

Current Sponsor:
1904-40 2 mile Std: 1941 1m Std: 1942-50 2m Std: 1951-56 1m 5furlong Std: 1957 2m Std: 1958-59 1m5f Std: 1960-61 2m Std: 1962-72 1m5f Std: 1973-81 2600mtrs Std: 1982 Race Discontinued
Handicap Pace. Last run 1981
Year: 1938

 
Race History
WINNER IRONSIDE  
TRAINER F J Smith DRIVER F J Smith TIME 4 22 2/5
HANDICAP 24 yards STAKE 800 DATE 12/08/1938
BREEDING 7g Wrack-Gatwick
OWNER W Hosking
AVON HANDICAP

Current Sponsor:
1904-06 1 Mile: 1907-33 2 Miles: 1917-18 Not Run: 1934-36 1 1/2 Miles: 1937 2 Miles: 1938 1 1/4 Miles: 1939-40 1 1/2 Miles: 1941-44 2 Miles: 1942 & 1943 Not Run: 1945-49 1 1/4 Miles.
Run from 1904 to 1949
Year: 1938

 
Race History
WINNER LAMENT  
TRAINER W J Doyle DRIVER W J Doyle TIME 2 52.0
HANDICAP Front STAKE 400 DATE 10/08/1938
BREEDING 7h Wrack-Echo
OWNER W J Doyle
INTERNATIONAL (SPRING) HANDICAP

Current Sponsor:
1906-1919 1 miles: 1920-1935 1mile: 1936-1940 1 miles: Race discontinued 1941
Handicap Pace
Year: 1938

 
Race History
WINNER LUCKY JACK  
TRAINER R B Berry DRIVER R B Berry TIME 2 56 2/5
HANDICAP 24 yards STAKE 450 DATE 6/08/1938
BREEDING 6h Jack Potts-Tairene
OWNER W T Lowe
CANTERBURY JUVENILE

Current Sponsor:
1938-60 1 1/4 Miles Std: 1942-45 & 1961-67 Not Run: 1968-69 1 Mile Mobile: 1970-73 1 1/4 Miles Std: 1974-75 2000m Std: 1976 2000m Mob: 1977-78 1 Mile Mob. In 1971&72 two races run.
2YO Pace run from 1938 to 1978
Year: 1938

 
Race History
WINNER ALDERSHOT  
TRAINER M Holmes DRIVER M Holmes TIME 2 51 2/5
HANDICAP Front STAKE 300 DATE 28/05/1938
BREEDING c Wrack-Trix Pointer
OWNER A J Nicholl
INTERDOMINION PACERS GRAND FINAL

Current Sponsor: ( SKYCITY )
Year: 1938

 
Race History
WINNER POT LUCK  
TRAINER M F Holmes DRIVER M F Holmes TIME 3 31 3/5
HANDICAP Stand 1M&5F (12yds) STAKE 2,250 DATE 4/05/1938
BREEDING 5g Jack Potts-Hope Dillon
OWNER H Stafford
Last 800 Last 400 MileRate 2 10.6
INTERDOMINION PACERS CONSOLATION

Current Sponsor: ( NRM )
2011 held by NZMTC at Alexandra Park
Year: 1938

 
Race History
WINNER GLENROSSIE  
TRAINER L O Thomas DRIVER L O Thomas TIME 3 34 2/5
HANDICAP Stand 1M&5F (12yds) STAKE $900 DATE 4/05/1938
BREEDING ag Matchlight-Alice Dillon
OWNER J McDonald
Last 800 Last 400 MileRate 2 12.0
INTERDOMINION PACERS CONSOLATION

Current Sponsor: ( NRM )
2011 held by NZMTC at Alexandra Park
Year: 1938

 
Race History
WINNER INDIANAPOLIS  
TRAINER J Fraser Jnr DRIVER D C Watts TIME 3 33.0
HANDICAP Stand 1M&5F (60yds) STAKE $900 DATE 4/05/1938
BREEDING ah Wrack-Estella Amos
OWNER G J Barton
Last 800 Last 400 MileRate 2 12.0
INTERDOMINION PACERS HEATS

Current Sponsor: ( GLENFERRIE FARM )
2011 - Racing held at Alexandra Park. Mobile 2700m 2014 - Heat held at Addington
Year: 1938

 
Race History
WINNER PARISIENNE  
TRAINER R B Berry DRIVER R B Berry TIME 4 34 4/5
HANDICAP Stand 2Miles (12yds) STAKE $1,500 DATE 26/04/1938
BREEDING 4m Rey de Oro-Yenot
OWNER Mrs D R Revell
Last 800 Last 400 MileRate 2 17.4
INTERDOMINION PACERS HEATS

Current Sponsor: ( GLENFERRIE FARM )
2011 - Racing held at Alexandra Park. Mobile 2700m 2014 - Heat held at Addington
Year: 1938

 
Race History
WINNER LUCKY JACK  
TRAINER R B Berry DRIVER R B Berry TIME 4 30 2/5
HANDICAP Stand 2Miles (24yds) STAKE $1,500 DATE 26/04/1938
BREEDING 5h Jack Potts-Tairene
OWNER W T Lowe
Last 800 Last 400 MileRate 2 15.2
INTERDOMINION PACERS HEATS

Current Sponsor: ( GLENFERRIE FARM )
2011 - Racing held at Alexandra Park. Mobile 2700m 2014 - Heat held at Addington
Year: 1938

 
Race History
WINNER U SCOTT  
TRAINER F C Dunlevey DRIVER F Holmes TIME 4 28 2/5
HANDICAP Stand 2Miles (Scr) STAKE $1,500 DATE 26/04/1938
BREEDING 6h Scotland-Lillian Hilta
OWNER J R McKenzie
Last 800 Last 400 MileRate 2 14.2
INTERDOMINION PACERS HEATS

Current Sponsor: ( GLENFERRIE FARM )
2011 - Racing held at Alexandra Park. Mobile 2700m 2014 - Heat held at Addington
Year: 1938

 
Race History
WINNER LUCKY JACK  
TRAINER R B Berry DRIVER R B Berry TIME 3 21.0
HANDICAP Stand 1M&Half STAKE $1,500 DATE 23/04/1938
BREEDING 5h Jack Potts-Tairene
OWNER W T Lowe
Last 800 Last 400 MileRate 2 14.0
INTERDOMINION PACERS HEATS

Current Sponsor: ( GLENFERRIE FARM )
2011 - Racing held at Alexandra Park. Mobile 2700m 2014 - Heat held at Addington
Year: 1938

 
Race History
WINNER PARISIENNE  
TRAINER R B Berry DRIVER R B Berry TIME 3 22 2/5
HANDICAP Stand 1M&Half STAKE $1,500 DATE 23/04/1938
BREEDING 4m Rey de Oro-Yenot
OWNER Mrs D R Revell
Last 800 Last 400 MileRate 2 14.9
INTERDOMINION PACERS HEATS

Current Sponsor: ( GLENFERRIE FARM )
2011 - Racing held at Alexandra Park. Mobile 2700m 2014 - Heat held at Addington
Year: 1938

 
Race History
WINNER SUPERTAX  
TRAINER R J Humphrey DRIVER G Mouritz TIME 3 20 1/5
HANDICAP Stand 1M&Half STAKE $1,500 DATE 23/04/1938
BREEDING ah Maxegin-Grace Logan
OWNER D Rodger
Last 800 Last 400 MileRate 2 13.5
INTERDOMINION PACERS HEATS

Current Sponsor: ( GLENFERRIE FARM )
2011 - Racing held at Alexandra Park. Mobile 2700m 2014 - Heat held at Addington
Year: 1938

 
Race History
WINNER PARISIENNE  
TRAINER R B Berry DRIVER R B Berry TIME 2 44 3/5
HANDICAP Stand 1M&Qtr (12yds) STAKE $1,500 DATE 20/04/1938
BREEDING 4m Rey de Oro-Yenot
OWNER Mrs D R Revell
Last 800 Last 400 MileRate 2 11.8
INTERDOMINION PACERS HEATS

Current Sponsor: ( GLENFERRIE FARM )
2011 - Racing held at Alexandra Park. Mobile 2700m 2014 - Heat held at Addington
Year: 1938

 
Race History
WINNER PLUTUS  
TRAINER C S Donald DRIVER C S Donald TIME 2 42 1/5
HANDICAP Stand 1M&Qtr (12yds) STAKE $1,500 DATE 20/04/1938
BREEDING 6h Nelson Derby-Fanny Logan
OWNER W J Gudsell
Last 800 Last 400 MileRate 2 09.8
INTERDOMINION PACERS HEATS

Current Sponsor: ( GLENFERRIE FARM )
2011 - Racing held at Alexandra Park. Mobile 2700m 2014 - Heat held at Addington
Year: 1938

 
Race History
WINNER SUPERTAX  
TRAINER R J Humphrey DRIVER G Mouritz TIME 3 20 1/5
HANDICAP Stand 1M&5F (36yds) STAKE $1,500 DATE 20/04/1938
BREEDING ah Maxegin-Grace Logan
OWNER D Rodger
Last 800 Last 400 MileRate 2 13.5
DENTON MEMORIAL

Current Sponsor:
2 Miles Handicap Pace
2 Miles Hcp Pace run from 1930-1939
Year: 1938

 
Race History
WINNER RENOWNS BEST  
TRAINER M Holmes DRIVER M Holmes TIME 4 26.0
HANDICAP 24 yards STAKE 400 DATE 19/02/1938
BREEDING 5m Grattan Loyal-Renown
OWNER Est F Fine
Last 800 Last 400 MileRate 2 13.0
PAPARUA HANDICAP PACE

Current Sponsor:
1919-38 2 Miles: 1939-40 1 1/2 Miles: 1941-42 2 Miles
Handicap Pace Run from 1919 to 1942
Year: 1938

 
Race History
WINNER BIG AUTHOR  
TRAINER O E Hooper DRIVER O E Hooper TIME 4 27.0
HANDICAP 12 yards STAKE 500 DATE 12/02/1938
BREEDING 9g Author Dillon-Dot Ribbons
OWNER E Sanders
Last 800 Last 400 MileRate 2 13 1/2
MASON HANDICAP PACE (CPTC)

Current Sponsor:
1933-41 2 Miles Std: 1942-46 1 5/8 Miles: 1947 1 1/2 Miles: 1948-52 1 5/8 Miles: 1953 2 Miles: 1954-56 1 5/8 Miles.
Handicap Pace run from 1933 to 1956
Year: 1938

 
Race History
WINNER PARISIENNE  
TRAINER R B Berry DRIVER R B Berry TIME 4 24 4/5
HANDICAP 12 yards STAKE 700 DATE 3/01/1938
BREEDING 5m Rey De Oro-Yenot
OWNER Mrs D R Revell
STEWARDS HANDICAP/ MILE (CPTC)

Current Sponsor:
1910 1 1/2 Miles: 1911-41 2 Miles: 1942-48 1 5/8 Miles: 1949-52 2 Miles: 1951 Not Run: 1953-63 1 5/8 Miles: 1964 1 1/4 Miles: 1965 1 5/8 Miles: 1966 1 1/4 Miles: 1967-81 1 Mile Mobile
Trotting Handicap/Mile: Run from 1910 to 1981 by Canterbury Park
Year: 1938

 
Race History
WINNER NORMAN FOX  
TRAINER G Edwards DRIVER G McKendry TIME 4 27.0
HANDICAP 48 yards STAKE 250 DATE 1/01/1938
BREEDING 11g Nelson Bingen-Carbinea
OWNER Miss A Norman
CANTERBURY HANDICAP (CPTC)

Current Sponsor:
1911-1945 2 Miles: 1947-58 1 5/8 Miles
Raced between 1911 and 1958
Year: 1938

 
Race History
WINNER GAMBLE  
TRAINER M B Edwards DRIVER M B Edwards TIME 4 24.0
HANDICAP 24 yards STAKE 1000 DATE 1/01/1938
BREEDING 7h Jack Potts-Princess Ann
OWNER Mrs E E Butcher
PRESIDENTS HANDICAP (NZMTC)

Current Sponsor:
1904 2 miles: 1905 1 1/2 miles: 1906-10 2 miles: 1911 1 1/2 miles: 1912-40 2 miles: 1938 & 1942-45 & 1948-49 & 1951 Not Run: 1941-47 1 5/8 miles: 1950-54 2 miles: 1955-63 1 5/8 miles: 1964-65 1 1/4 miles: 1966-68 1 5/8 miles.
Handicap Pace. Run from 1904 to 1968
Year: 1938

 
Race History
WINNER Not Run  
TRAINER DRIVER TIME
HANDICAP STAKE DATE 31/03/1937
BREEDING
OWNER
EASTER CUP

Current Sponsor: ( BRECKON FARMS & ALL STARS RACING )
Prior to 1939 Easter Hcp Two Miles: 1918 & 1938 Not Run: 1940 1 1/2 miles: 1942-1946 Two Miles: 1947 & 48 Easter Stakes FFA One Mile & Half: 1949-50 Easter Hcp: 1951 Not Run: 1952-1970 One Mile & Five Furlongs: 1972-1973 Two Miles: 1983 GROUP 2:
GROUP 1: Pace: 3200 Metres: Standing Start
Year: 1938

 
Race History
WINNER Not Run  
TRAINER DRIVER TIME
HANDICAP STAKE DATE 27/03/1937
BREEDING
OWNER
CRAVEN HANDICAP PACE

Current Sponsor:
1919-42 1 1/4 Miles: 1935 & 1938 Not Run: 1943-49 2 Miles
Handicap Pace Run from 1919 to 1949
Year: 1938

 
Race History
WINNER Not Run  
TRAINER DRIVER TIME
HANDICAP STAKE DATE 23/01/1937
BREEDING
OWNER


In the event that you cannot find the information you require from the contents, please contact Colin Steele in the Racing Department at Addington Raceway.
Phone (03) 338 9094