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INTERNATIONAL HISTORY

Francisco Franco becomes dictator of Spain.

George Gershwin's Porgy & Bess breaks new ground in musicals.

Aircraft detection by radar is developed by Robert Watson Watt.

LOCAL HISTORY

The Labour Party wins a landslide election victory and over the following few years inaugurates reforms, including a free health service. The defeated Reform and United parties merge to form the Nationa Party.

January 19-21 - Visit by the Duke of Gloucester.

July 1 - Evening papers "Star" & "Sun" merge to become the "Star Sun", ending a 6 year newspaper war, the longest and most bitter in NZ's history. The "peace" agreement between the 3 companies concerned also saw the demise of the "Christchurch Times" (once the "Lyttelton Times"), the oldest daily paper in the country.

December 17 - City Council decides to buy 230 acres of land at Harewood for a city airport. The purchase was strongly criticised in many quarters as excessively large.

Credit: Ch-Ch City Libraries

RACING HISTORY MESCELLANY

A 'CATCH DRIVE'

At the Canterbury Owners and Breeder's Cup Trials at Addington last week, Mr E T McDermott recalled that at the Burlesque Race Meeting at Addington in 1935, the late Mr Allan Matson had driven a huge bullock, hitched to an old-fashioned four-wheeled buggy, down the straight.

The bullock was a very quiet one who, at that time, was a common sight at several agricultural and pastrol shows around Canterbury.

Credit: NZ Trotting Calendar 13Nov68

RACING HISTORY FEATURE RACE COMMENT

George Barton receives the Cup from Sir Heaton Rhodes
1935 NEW ZEALAND TROTTING CUP

Refer also 1934 Cup for comment.

Indianapolis, a son of imported parents in Wrack and Estella Amos, was bred at Durbar Lodge by Harry Nicoll's son Arthur and bought as an early 3-year-old by Dunedin's George Barton, the leading owner each year for a decade during this time, on the recommendation of Billie Tomkinson.

The entire was in 'star class' by the end of his 4-year-old season, but Tomkinson had died prior to the 1934 Cup and Indianapolis was prepared by his right-hand-man Claude Dunleavy for the remainder of his career.

His first Cup win was a mere formality from 12 yards over Blue Mountain(Fr) and Harlod Logan(72yds), but there was another star on the horizon at the meeting that year in the form of War Buoy, who was in the process of putting together an unbeaten career of 10 wins, a sequence that remained unmatched until Cardigan Bay eclipsed it some 30 years later.

War Buoy took his record to 15 wins from 17 starts when he won the August Handicap at the National Meeting as a 5-year-old, so as the Cup loomed with War Buoy off the front and Indianapolis off 48 yards, there was much anticipation. Particularly when War Buoy skipped six lengths clear turning for home for Stan Edwards, but Indianapolis was commencing his run at the same time six-wide and in the end had three lengths to spare.

It was no less exciting the following year when Indianapolis(48yds) became the first three-time winner after a great tussle with Red Shadow(24yds), War Buoy(Fr) and Harold Logan(48yds). A rejuvenated Red Shadow, back in the Bryce stable, had skipped clear at the three furlongs while Indianapolis appeared to be languishing in the rear. But with giant strides, Indianapolis drew level at the 100m for Jack Fraser and came away to confirm his status as one of the greatest stayers ever seen.


Credit: New Zealand HRWeekly 8Oct03

RACING HISTORY FEATURE RACE COMMENT

1935 NEW ZEALAND CUP

1500 sovs: 4min 26sec class: Two Miles

The heavy track took a lot of interest out of the New Zealand Cup from a time point of view, for it was early recognised that exceptional speed was out of the question. Yet it proved a great race won by a great horse for the second time in succession.

The start was delayed for a time on account of the restlessness of Tempest, and when the field was given the word Wild Guy refused to leave the mark and War Buoy going off at a tangle lost a few lengths. Tempest began with unusual brilliance, and soon had a good six lengths' lead from Evicus, War Buoy, and Sunny Morn.

At the end of the first quarter mile Sunny Morn was in front from Evicus and Worthy Light who were heading a bunched field, while making up ground were Roi l'Or, who had headed Indianapolis, with Wild Guy practically out of the race. With a round to go the excitment was intense, and at this stage Sir Guy was in command from Red Shadow, who had had a good run on the rails. Evicus, Worthy Light, Sunny Morn, Blue Mountain, and War Buoy, the three last-named almost in line with Roi l'Or going well on the rails, followed by Indianapolis.

Running out of the straight and into the back stretch F Holmes, behind Roi l'Or, gained a big stretch of ground through a run on the rails, but Sir Guy still carried on from Evicus and Red Shadow, with Blue Mountain, Worthy Light, War Buoy, Roi l'Or, Sunny Morn, who had dropped back, and Indianapolis following. Three furlongs from home War Buoy commenced a great sprint on the outside of the field, and was first into the straight in front of Blue Mountain, Evicus, Sunny Morn, and Indianapolis, who were almost in line, the last-named well on the outside.

War Buoy had a good advantage of Indianapolis at the straight entrance, but the latter, on the better going on the outside, fairly buried the younger horse for speed, and he had a comfortable margin in his favour as the post was passed, with Red Shadow two lengths away, followed by Sunny Morn, Blue Mountain, and Roi l'Or, with Evicus, Sir Guy, and Worthy Light followed in that order, and Wild Guy pulled up.

The winner was driven a very fine race by J Fraser, jun., who was not in a hurry from the start and exercised the greatest patience with the object of utilising to the full the well-known brilliance of the Wrack stallion. With three furlongs to go Indianapolis was still a good way from the leaders, but in racing on the outside of the field he had an advantage in the much better going on that part of the course. He put in a brilliant sprint that even the great horse, War Buoy, could not deal with. It was the second Cup won by Mr G J Barton's horse.

War Buoy may have been inconvenienced by his slow beginning, and while he was forced to cover extra ground all the way, he was possibly better served by having the advantage of the pace-making provided. In defeat he proved a truly great pacer, as plucky a racehorse as ever graced a trotting course.

Red Shadow, enjoyed the advantage of a run on the rails, but this was counterbalanced by the heavier going on that part of the course. He was well handled by L F Berkett, and went his best race since the Cup two years ago.

Sunny Morn, ran the solid race expected of him, and Blue Mountain had every chance, but lacked the brilliance that characterised his last year's effort.

Worthy Light impressed by the good showing he made, and he faded out two furlongs from home, as might have been expected after the interruption to his preparation.

Roi l'Or ran a great race, and after beginning smartly he streaked up on the rails to occupy a very handy postion four furlongs from home. The brilliant bursts of the others left him a hopeless case in the straight.

Evicus was at her best up to the last three furlongs, and may be improved by the race. Sir Guy is in the same category, but Tempest was not dangerous after the first half mile, and Wild Guy's chance was extinguished at the start.

Credit: THE PRESS 13 Nov 1935

RACING HISTORY FEATURE RACE COMMENT

1935 DOMINION HANDICAP

600 sovs: Unhoppled trotters: Two Miles

The Dominion Handicap served to show the public one of the most brilliant trotters ever raced in New Zealand, Sea Gift, who, giving away 36 yards, fairly outclassed her field over the concluding stages.

Lough Guy set out to win from end to end, and he did his task well for the greater part of the journey just ahead of First Wrack, Admiral Bingen, Stanley T and Raima, while Todd Lonzia, beginning very fast, was soon in a handy position, and Writer and Nell Volo were nicely placed.

At the straight entrance Lough Guy held the lead from Stanley T, First Wrack, and Raima, while wide on the course Sea Gift was putting in brilliant work. At the distance Stanley T, appeared a certain winner, but Sea Gift finished in most determined fashion and fairly buried the opposition for speed over the later stages, while the tiring Lough Guy was third, Raima fourth, and First Wrack fifth.

Sea Gift has come through her various classes in the manner of a champion, and it is doubtful whether any other trotter in New Zealand would match her over any distance. This was one of the best performances ever registered at Addington, and stamped Sea Gift as a genuine stayer and a brilliant sprinter.

Stanley T, evidently suited by the going went his best race for some time and he was in the firing line right to the finish. Lough Guy tried to win all the way and he put up a really good display. Raima's effort may be described as solid without being brilliant. Nell Volo gave a display that suggested the lack of a race and she should do better as the meeting advances. Norma Bingen failed to stay on and Todd Lonzia again showed an ineptitude to handle the going.

Credit: THE PRESS 13 Nov 1935

RACING HISTORY FEATURE RACE COMMENT

1935 NEW ZEALAND DERBY

Double Great was second favourite in the New Zealand Derby Stakes, and after being one of the leaders from the start, he fairly outstayed the rest of the field in the run down the straight.

Gaillard gave some trouble at the start, but he was one of the first away at the release of the barriers, and with Double Great, Frisco Lady, and Superior Rank in close attendance they raced into the back stretch. At the top of the straight, J Bryce, jun., behind Double Great appeared to slow the field up, and as they raced past the stands, Double Great and Gaillard were just showing the way to Pot Luck, on the inside, Superior Rank, Frisco Lady and Casanova.

It was not until three furlongs from home that real racing commenced, and at this stage Casanova made a fast run on the outside of the field, while Gaillard began to feel the strain. Double Great and Casanova were first into the straight, just ahead of Pot Luck, Frisco Lady, and Superior Rank. The result was never in doubt, for though Double Great had to be touched up with the whip he was not so distressed as some of the others, and he had a comfortable margin in his favour as the post was reached.

Double Great, is a worthy son of a worthy sire, Great Bingen, and gifted with excellent racing temperament, he is likely to develop into a good stake winner. He had evidently been improved by his race on the first, and the runner up, Frisco Lady was perhaps unlucky in not having the privilege of racing on Tuesday. The chestnut filly would have been better suited by a fast track, for at the start she did not appear at home on the going, but once on the good surface in the straight, she finished straight and true under a hard drive. Frisco Lady has won two races and has been once second in three races. On a good fast track she will still further improve.

Casanova did not have any the best of the running, and three furlongs from home he put in a very fast run on the outside of the field. He looked a picture and is likely to develop into a good stayer. Superior Rank was always in the firing line, and registered a good performance to finish fourth. Pot Luck tired over the later stages, and Gaillard, after being well placed early in the race, was well beaten over the last quarter mile. He did not appear at home in the sticky going.

Credit: THE PRESS 15 Nov 1935

RACING HISTORY FEATURE RACE COMMENT

1935 LOUISSON MEMORIAL

Two Miles: Wnrs time 4min 39 2/5sec

The War Buoy-Gold Tinge bracket was sent out a very warm first choice for the Louisson Memorial, which provided a splendid race, and a very exciting finish.

Gold Tinge at once set out to make the running from Trampfast and Taxpayer, with Wild Guy and Sunny Morn well placed, and Worthy Light in a handy position. With the exception of Blue Mountain, who bobbled at the start, and Roi l'Or, who was giving away 72 yards, the field was well bunched, and approaching the straight War Buoy and Sunny Morn both moved up sharply to tackle the leader, Gold Tinge. The pair fought out a finish from the distance post, and in a most exciting race War Buoy won by the narrowest of margins from Sunny Morn, Gold Tinge, Roi l'Or, and Trampfast.

A splendid record stands to the credit of War Buoy, who has now had 21 starts for 16 wins, four seconds and a third. He finished in his usual determined manner, but was all out to beat the consistent Sunny Morn. The latter had run fourth in the Cup, and evidently was not inconvenienced by the earlier effort.

Gold Tinge attempted to make all the running, and went a fine race, and Trampfast showed speed away from the barrier and carried on for the greater part of the journey. Roi l'Or found the handicap too great, Red Shadow faded out badly with a round to go, and Worthy Light's running suggested that he was short of a race.

Credit: THE PRESS 15 Nov 1935

RACING HISTORY FEATURE RACE COMMENT

1935 CLARKSON MEMORIAL HANDICAP

2min 10sec class: One Mile: Winners time 2min 9 1/5sec

Indianapolis gave a grand exhibition of pacing in the last race, for, going away (from 48yds) very steadily without any great show of brilliance, he was last but one as the quarter mile was passed, and at this stage Harold Logan (from 72yds) was within a length of him.

He left the little pacer three lengths in the run down the back, and at the three furlongs he commenced a brilliant run, and going round the outside he buried the remainder for speed. He won comfortably and could have increased his lead.

The brilliance of Indianapolis was demonstrated on this occasion in comparison with Harold Logan. The burst that the Wrack stallion put in from the half mile to the three furlongs post left Harold Logan in a hopeless position, and after this Indianapolis went on the outside of his field and fairly flew down the straight.

On this showing he is the best horse raced in New Zealand. He was not extended and the Cup race had improved him. His last half mile was something to remember. Tempest, stable-mate of the winner, was driven a good race by D C Watts and with everything in his favour he gained second place over Evicus, who went a sterling race from start to finish. The Tasmanian mare is a splendid pacer, and will be unlucky not to win a race at the meeting.

Credit: THE PRESS 15 Nov 1935

RACING HISTORY FEATURE RACE COMMENT

1935 OLLIVIER MEMORIAL HANDICAP

750 sovs: Two miles : Winners time 4min 26 4/5sec

The Ollivier Memorial Handicap provided one of the most spectacular races seen at Addington for many a day, for the whole field raced in a bunch for the length of the journey and a battle royal between the champion four-year-olds had the crowd worked to a great pitch of excitement.

Gamble did not begin with any brilliance, and the trotter Todd Lonzia was quickest to find his feet, just ahead of Vesuvius, Graham Direct, Wrecker, Avernus, and Taxpayer, with Gamble next. Before half a mile had been covered Wrecker went to the front with Graham Direct, Vesuvius and Avernus racing together just ahead of Gamble.

The last-named made a forward move and raced up to Wrecker, and the pair carried on from Sunny Morn, who had come fast, Graham Direct, Todd Lonzia, Tempest, Avernus, Taxpayer, Evicus, Wrackler, and Worthy Light.

As the final run was commenced Graham Direct made his effort and a furlong from home the four-year-olds settled down to a battle royal. Every inch of the ground was contested, and with both horses under the whip Gamble held his own to win by a very narrow margin, which only the judge could tell. Tempest secured third place with one of his brilliant bursts after being nicely placed all the way. Following closely were Vesuvius, Todd Lonzia, Worthy Light and Evicus.

In his victory Gamble proved himself a brilliant pacer, for after doing most of the pace-making he fought the issue in the gamest manner possible and he was finishing better than his rival. In defeat Graham Direct proved his gameness and his challenge was a very determined one. Tempest was always handy and finished with a rare burst, while Vesuvius was always in the picture. Sunny Morn did not finish too well after making a great run in the middle stages, but both Evicus and Worthy Light showed staying powers.

Credit: THE PRESS 16 Nov 1935

RACING HISTORY FEATURE RACE COMMENT

1935 NEW ZEALAND FREE-FOR-ALL

Excitement was at fever heat when the horses paraded for the Free-For-All but the public appeared to be well satisfied that the mighty Indianapolis, who was bracketed with Tempest, was next to unbeatable.

There was a little delay at the start through horses backing out, and when the barriers were released all went off smartly except Indianapolis, who lost several lengths through tangling. While Harold Logan hit the front and set a merry pace for the first furlong, J Fraser, jun, did not allow Indianapolis to waste any time once he had stuck his hopples, and when a quarter of a mile had been covered he was just behind Tempest, who was a length in the rear of Harold Logan.

As the stands were passed Indianapolis was running closer to the leader, and the margin was still further reduced going down the back. By the time the quarter mile post was reached Harold Logan was only half a length in front, and at the straight entrance his driver drew the whip. Harold Logan made a valiant fight, but the long-striding Wrack pacer wore him down, and 100 yards from home he held him safely.

Harold Logan, apparently beaten, also succumbed to the fast-finishing Tempest, who had all the best of the running, and Roi l'Or, who got up in time to deprive him of third money. Red Shadow was beaten for speed in the final stages, and Evicus tailed the field.

Indianapolis showed the speed and racing qualities of a champion, and possibly his lead at the finish might have been increased had his driver desired. Tempest is a brilliant pacer when conditions suit, and in this race he was admirably driven by D C Watts, a young driver, who does not receive all the chances his ability deserves. Roi l'Or, who tailed the field for the greater part of the journey, put in a characteristic burst over the final stages, and while Harold Logan was well beaten, Red Shadow had also had enough, and Evicus disappointed by her failure to run on at the end.

The first half mile was covered in 1min 6 4/5sec, six furlongs in 1min 39sec, a mile in 2min 8sec, and the full journey in 2min 39 2/5sec, the last half mile in 60 2/5sec.

Credit: THE PRESS 16 Nov 1935

RACING HISTORY FEATURE RACE COMMENT

1935 SPRING MEETING OVERVIEW

The New Zealand Metropolitan Trotting Club was not in luck's way in the opening of the spring meeting yesterday, for heavy rain overnight and in the forenoon had badly affected the track, and trotting form generally is governed by performances in fine weather. The attendance in consequence was seriously affected, and the public did not show the usual confidence in supporting well known pacers on a treacherous track.

It was not a good opening for the leading trotting meeting in New Zealand, and perhaps the whole blame cannot be attributed to the weather. A drop of 5577 in the totalisator investments as compared with the opening day last year must give the Metropolitan Club food for serious thought, and some part of the reduced turnover may perhaps be attributed to lack of modern totalisator equipment. The sum of 36,786 10s was invested on the eight races, as compared with 42,363 10s on the opening day 12 months ago.

The racing was of the highest class although the heavy state of the track was all against fast times, and at least two performances were outstanding in the history of trotting in New Zealand. Indianapolis won the New Zealand Cup like a champion racehorse, for though the time he registered was more than 23 seconds slower than his last year's record, he gave a display of pacing seldom equalled. He did not begin with any show of brilliance and soon after the start Roi l'Or, who was conceding him 12 yards start, was on his wheel, and passed him long before the serious racing commenced, while the back marker hugged the rails and covered no extra ground, Indianapolis kept on the outside of the field, and the wisdom of his driver was proved.

When it came to sprinting over the last part the big stallion had a reasonably good footing, while the others struggled in sticky mud that materially hampered progress. No excuses were made for the other horses for Indianapolis proved himself a champion pacer and won with a good deal in hand. His trainer, F C Dunleavy, must be accorded full credit for the training of a horse that many believe to be a two-minute pacer, and like the best of trainers he has left a margin for improvement in his condition that will be shown as the meeting progresses.

Indianapolis has not won his last race, and if produced again at the meeting he may do even better. It is to be sincerely hoped that the weather during the week may be better than it was yesterday, in which case Indianapolis may be expected to make a new record. He is already the champion miler in New Zealand, and a two miles record is well within his compass.

While the performance of the six-year-old was great, credit must be given to M B Edwards, who produced War Buoy in condition to race for a kingdom. War Buoy has a long string of victories to his credit and in 20 starts he has not been out of a place. Unfortunately M B Edwards was not well enough to drive his favourite who was left in the capable hands of his brother S A, who exerted all his energy and skill to win the New Zealand Cup with a wonderful young racehorse.

The light harness enthusiast loves the unhoppled trotter, and a feast was provided in the great display given by Sea Gift, a mare who, by the sheer merit of her performances on the track, has risen from the maiden class to be now regarded as one of the best ever seen at Addington. Her finish in the Dominion Handicap was a remarkable one and the speed she exhibited over the later stages when apparently in a hopeless position had the crowd in a fever of excitement. Her win was a popular one, but not nearly as popular as it would have been had some of her earlier performances been more consistent.

It is a pity the track was not in order for Todd Lonzia to show his paces, for this horse was plainly all at sea on the tricky course and could not control his balance or speed for any distance.

The trotters and pacers of today are better than ever before, and especially pleasing is the great improvement made in the ranks of the trotters.

A most interesting race on the programme was the Riccarton Stakes, for maiden three-year-olds, and while Double Great won very comfortably, the race served to show a number of very promising youngsters who stood at the barrier like experienced race-horses and displayed the excellent training they had gone through.

The day's racing concluded with a most exciting finish in the Hagley Handicap, and only the judge could correctly place the leading horses, who flashed past the post almost in line.

-o0o-

THE PRESS 15 Nov 1935

DERBY DAY AT ADDINGTON

The racing at Addington yesterday provided as varied a programme as has been offered for many a day, and the uneven state of the track presented a problem that demanded the closest study by drivers. In the early part of the day the extreme outside provided the only good footing for horses, and as the afternoon wore on the course improved towards the centre, while in the closing stages the application of light harrows made a surface on which something like real speed could be shown.

The Addington course yesterday presented a problem. drivers with reputations for astuteness quite failed to realise the pitfalls of tricky going, and they failed rather badly while others enjoyed all the benefits. In the earlier contests division races seemed to be the order of the day, one section racing on the inside on heavy going and taking the shortest way to the winning post, while others preferred the more reliable footing on the outside of the course. The longest way round sometimes proved the shortest way home, and it was noticeable that horses were quickly slowed up when they attempted the inside going. Had the track been in good order from the start it is possible that several records would have been broken.

Indianapolis proved the star turn when he won the Clakson Memorial, a race named after the well-known sportsman and very live figure in framing the programmes for the Metropolitan Trotting Club.

Indianapolis was set to give away 48 yards in a mile race, and with the field racing well out from the rails he appeared to be set an impossible task. Harold Logan was on 72 yards behind, but before two furlongs had been covered he was in a nice position, just behind the big pacer. The latter, with a phenomenal burst of speed, left the little gelding well behind, and he carried on a sensational run round his field to win as he liked in 2min 9 1/5sec, which under the conditions was one of the greatest performances ever witnessed in New Zealand. Indianapolis is the pacer of the hour, a fine-mannered stallion who may be still further improved by the experience he will receive in his racing.

Not less impressive were the great performances of Sea Gift and Nell Volo in the Sockburn Handicap, yet both were defeated by First Wrack, who was admirably handled by M Holmes and came home in the manner of a true and tried racehorse. Had the track been in good order Sea Gift would probably have won in the fastest time registered by a trotter in New Zealand, but extra distance and the fortunes of the race told the inevitable tale.

The New Zealand Derby Stakes, the Blue Riband of the Dominion, was a race worthy of the occasion, and while Double Great won on his merits and proved himself a regular son of Great Bingen, one of the best horses of all times, there were others in Frisco Lady, Gaillard, and Casanova who contested with him a very serious race. As in the other races the state of the course was something to be reckoned with.

An ill-founded rumour circulated on Wednesday affected the attendance and the peculiar nature of the course naturally discouraged speculation, and to these two causes may be attributed a drop in the totalisator investments from 27,528 last year to 25,619 10s. The racing has not been better at any previous meeting, the management of the club staff and honorary officials was right up to standard, and generally the whole day's racing gave promise of great sport today.

-o0o-

THE PRESS 16 Nov 1935

BATTLE ROYAL BETWEEN FOUR-YEAR-OLDS

In the history of trotting at Addington it is doubtful whether any better sport has been witnessed than was provided yesterday. The weather, which had not been favourable on the two previous days, was ideal for light harness racing, and the attendance was reminiscent of show days of years ago. The track, which on the first two days was very heavy, was at its best for the sport, but, having receiveda thorough soaking, it was not so fast as on some previous occasions, and a strong easterly wind did not help in fast time making. The finishes were as close and the racing as exciting as the big crowd could have wished, and the perfomances of a number of horses were exceptional.

In the principal event of the day, the Ollivier Memorial Handicap, the battle for four-year-old supremacy took place between Gamble and Graham Direct, and the public was treated to a battle royal over the last furlong between horses possibly the best of their age raced in New Zealand. It was a stirring contest, and long before the horses reached the straight, the excitement was intense. Great horses driven by expert reinsmen provided a test of gameness and stamina not often witnessed on a racecourse. Gamble won. In victory he proved himself a super horse, and in defeat Graham Direct showed the true fighting qualities of the standardbred pacer.

The true test of the Dominion's champions was provided in the Free-For-All in which there were only six starters - the best six that could be produced. Harold Logan who has reigned as the recognised champion, had his colours lowered by possibly the greatest pacer New Zealand has seen in Indianapolis, a horse with a record of 2min 1 2/5sec for a mile. It was not an easy victory for Harold Logan, beginning smartly, contested every inch of the long journey down the final stretch. He was beaten, and beaten out of a place, but it was only in the last 100 yards that he found age and hard racing telling on him and he faded in the challenge by younger horses. Harold Logan was not disgraced. He did everything a good horse should do, but he met a great horse that not only matched him for speed but showed better staying powers.

The real treat of the afternoon was provided by the unhoppled trotters in the Middleton Handicap, and Sea Gift's performance in covering two miles in 4min 24 3/5sec, better time than any pacer had registered at the meeting was one of the highlights of trotting. She was beaten into second place by another fine trotter in First Wrack, but while the latter had all the advantages of good pace-making and a handy position in the field, Sea Gift, from 84 yards behind, was forced to cover a lot of extra ground to get round a field that was well bunched from the start. What Sea Gift's performance meant can hardly be imagined, but it was possibly the greatest exhibition of trotting ever witnessed at Addington. At no stage of the race was she within 15 feet of the rails, and this, in a contest over two miles on a six furlong track, is a very severe handicap.

Flotsam defeated Airflow in the opening race after a fine display in fast time. Recess proved a good game pacer by winning the Sprinter's Handicap from a bunched field after she had had to concede a start over the last quarter mile.

Grand Mogul showed stamina when he led all the way to win the Australasian Handicap. Bingen Palm, who comes from Westport, scored a popular victory in the Hornby Handicap after a sterling performance and Rey Spec's victory in the Lyttelton Handicap may be credited to the expert reinsmanship of M Holmes.

The track, which was in splendid order, was a credit to the custodian, Mr J Highsted; the starting which was in the hands of Mr A J Hastings was excellently done; and altogether staff and honorary officials helped to provide an excellent day of entertainment.

The totalisator investments, which on the two previous days had shown a decrease on last years figures, went up from 1935 SPRING MEETING OVERVIEW

The New Zealand Metropolitan Trotting Club was not in luck's way in the opening of the spring meeting yesterday, for heavy rain overnight and in the forenoon had badly affected the track, and trotting form generally is governed by performances in fine weather. The attendance in consequence was seriously affected, and the public did not show the usual confidence in supporting well known pacers on a treacherous track.

It was not a good opening for the leading trotting meeting in New Zealand, and perhaps the whole blame cannot be attributed to the weather. A drop of 5577 in the totalisator investments as compared with the opening day last year must give the Metropolitan Club food for serious thought, and some part of the reduced turnover may perhaps be attributed to lack of modern totalisator equipment. The sum of 36,786 10s was invested on the eight races, as compared with 42,363 10s on the opening day 12 months ago.

The racing was of the highest class although the heavy state of the track was all against fast times, and at least two performances were outstanding in the history of trotting in New Zealand. Indianapolis won the New Zealand Cup like a champion racehorse, for though the time he registered was more than 23 seconds slower than his last year's record, he gave a display of pacing seldom equalled. He did not begin with any show of brilliance and soon after the start Roi l'Or, who was conceding him 12 yards start, was on his wheel, and passed him long before the serious racing commenced, while the back marker hugged the rails and covered no extra ground, Indianapolis kept on the outside of the field, and the wisdom of his driver was proved.

When it came to sprinting over the last part the big stallion had a reasonably good footing, while the others struggled in sticky mud that materially hampered progress. No excuses were made for the other horses for Indianapolis proved himself a champion pacer and won with a good deal in hand. His trainer, F C Dunleavy, must be accorded full credit for the training of a horse that many believe to be a two-minute pacer, and like the best of trainers he has left a margin for improvement in his condition that will be shown as the meeting progresses.

Indianapolis has not won his last race, and if produced again at the meeting he may do even better. It is to be sincerely hoped that the weather during the week may be better than it was yesterday, in which case Indianapolis may be expected to make a new record. He is already the champion miler in New Zealand, and a two miles record is well within his compass.

While the performance of the six-year-old was great, credit must be given to M B Edwards, who produced War Buoy in condition to race for a kingdom. War Buoy has a long string of victories to his credit and in 20 starts he has not been out of a place. Unfortunately M B Edwards was not well enough to drive his favourite who was left in the capable hands of his brother S A, who exerted all his energy and skill to win the New Zealand Cup with a wonderful young racehorse.

The light harness enthusiast loves the unhoppled trotter, and a feast was provided in the great display given by Sea Gift, a mare who, by the sheer merit of her performances on the track, has risen from the maiden class to be now regarded as one of the best ever seen at Addington. Her finish in the Dominion Handicap was a remarkable one and the speed she exhibited over the later stages when apparently in a hopeless position had the crowd in a fever of excitement. Her win was a popular one, but not nearly as popular as it would have been had some of her earlier performances been more consistent.

It is a pity the track was not in order for Todd Lonzia to show his paces, for this horse was plainly all at sea on the tricky course and could not control his balance or speed for any distance.

The trotters and pacers of today are better than ever before, and especially pleasing is the great improvement made in the ranks of the trotters.

A most interesting race on the programme was the Riccarton Stakes, for maiden three-year-olds, and while Double Great won very comfortably, the race served to show a number of very promising youngsters who stood at the barrier like experienced race-horses and displayed the excellent training they had gone through.

The day's racing concluded with a most exciting finish in the Hagley Handicap, and only the judge could correctly place the leading horses, who flashed past the post almost in line.

-o0o-

THE PRESS 15 Nov 1935

DERBY DAY AT ADDINGTON

The racing at Addington yesterday provided as varied a programme as has been offered for many a day, and the uneven state of the track presented a problem that demanded the closest study by drivers. In the early part of the day the extreme outside provided the only good footing for horses, and as the afternoon wore on the course improved towards the centre, while in the closing stages the application of light harrows made a surface on which something like real speed could be shown.

The Addington course yesterday presented a problem. drivers with reputations for astuteness quite failed to realise the pitfalls of tricky going, and they failed rather badly while others enjoyed all the benefits. In the earlier contests division races seemed to be the order of the day, one section racing on the inside on heavy going and taking the shortest way to the winning post, while others preferred the more reliable footing on the outside of the course. The longest way round sometimes proved the shortest way home, and it was noticeable that horses were quickly slowed up when they attempted the inside going. Had the track been in good order from the start it is possible that several records would have been broken.

Indianapolis proved the star turn when he won the Clakson Memorial, a race named after the well-known sportsman and very live figure in framing the programmes for the Metropolitan Trotting Club.

Indianapolis was set to give away 48 yards in a mile race, and with the field racing well out from the rails he appeared to be set an impossible task. Harold Logan was on 72 yards behind, but before two furlongs had been covered he was in a nice position, just behind the big pacer. The latter, with a phenomenal burst of speed, left the little gelding well behind, and he carried on a sensational run round his field to win as he liked in 2min 9 1/5sec, which under the conditions was one of the greatest performances ever witnessed in New Zealand. Indianapolis is the pacer of the hour, a fine-mannered stallion who may be still further improved by the experience he will receive in his racing.

Not less impressive were the great performances of Sea Gift and Nell Volo in the Sockburn Handicap, yet both were defeated by First Wrack, who was admirably handled by M Holmes and came home in the manner of a true and tried racehorse. Had the track been in good order Sea Gift would probably have won in the fastest time registered by a trotter in New Zealand, but extra distance and the fortunes of the race told the inevitable tale.

The New Zealand Derby Stakes, the Blue Riband of the Dominion, was a race worthy of the occasion, and while Double Great won on his merits and proved himself a regular son of Great Bingen, one of the best horses of all times, there were others in Frisco Lady, Gaillard, and Casanova who contested with him a very serious race. As in the other races the state of the course was something to be reckoned with.

An ill-founded rumour circulated on Wednesday affected the attendance and the peculiar nature of the course naturally discouraged speculation, and to these two causes may be attributed a drop in the totalisator investments from 27,528 last year to 25,619 10s. The racing has not been better at any previous meeting, the management of the club staff and honorary officials was right up to standard, and generally the whole day's racing gave promise of great sport today.

-o0o-

THE PRESS 16 Nov 1935

BATTLE ROYAL BETWEEN FOUR-YEAR-OLDS

In the history of trotting at Addington it is doubtful whether any better sport has been witnessed than was provided yesterday. The weather, which had not been favourable on the two previous days, was ideal for light harness racing, and the attendance was reminiscent of show days of years ago. The track, which on the first two days was very heavy, was at its best for the sport, but, having receiveda thorough soaking, it was not so fast as on some previous occasions, and a strong easterly wind did not help in fast time making. The finishes were as close and the racing as exciting as the big crowd could have wished, and the perfomances of a number of horses were exceptional.

In the principal event of the day, the Ollivier Memorial Handicap, the battle for four-year-old supremacy took place between Gamble and Graham Direct, and the public was treated to a battle royal over the last furlong between horses possibly the best of their age raced in New Zealand. It was a stirring contest, and long before the horses reached the straight, the excitement was intense. Great horses driven by expert reinsmen provided a test of gameness and stamina not often witnessed on a racecourse. 1935 SPRING MEETING OVERVIEW

The New Zealand Metropolitan Trotting Club was not in luck's way in the opening of the spring meeting yesterday, for heavy rain overnight and in the forenoon had badly affected the track, and trotting form generally is governed by performances in fine weather. The attendance in consequence was seriously affected, and the public did not show the usual confidence in supporting well known pacers on a treacherous track.

It was not a good opening for the leading trotting meeting in New Zealand, and perhaps the whole blame cannot be attributed to the weather. A drop of 5577 in the totalisator investments as compared with the opening day last year must give the Metropolitan Club food for serious thought, and some part of the reduced turnover may perhaps be attributed to lack of modern totalisator equipment. The sum of 36,786 10s was invested on the eight races, as compared with 42,363 10s on the opening day 12 months ago.

The racing was of the highest class although the heavy state of the track was all against fast times, and at least two performances were outstanding in the history of trotting in New Zealand. Indianapolis won the New Zealand Cup like a champion racehorse, for though the time he registered was more than 23 seconds slower than his last year's record, he gave a display of pacing seldom equalled. He did not begin with any show of brilliance and soon after the start Roi l'Or, who was conceding him 12 yards start, was on his wheel, and passed him long before the serious racing commenced, while the back marker hugged the rails and covered no extra ground, Indianapolis kept on the outside of the field, and the wisdom of his driver was proved.

When it came to sprinting over the last part the big stallion had a reasonably good footing, while the others struggled in sticky mud that materially hampered progress. No excuses were made for the other horses for Indianapolis proved himself a champion pacer and won with a good deal in hand. His trainer, F C Dunleavy, must be accorded full credit for the training of a horse that many believe to be a two-minute pacer, and like the best of trainers he has left a margin for improvement in his condition that will be shown as the meeting progresses.

Indianapolis has not won his last race, and if produced again at the meeting he may do even better. It is to be sincerely hoped that the weather during the week may be better than it was yesterday, in which case Indianapolis may be expected to make a new record. He is already the champion miler in New Zealand, and a two miles record is well within his compass.

While the performance of the six-year-old was great, credit must be given to M B Edwards, who produced War Buoy in condition to race for a kingdom. War Buoy has a long string of victories to his credit and in 20 starts he has not been out of a place. Unfortunately M B Edwards was not well enough to drive his favourite who was left in the capable hands of his brother S A, who exerted all his energy and skill to win the New Zealand Cup with a wonderful young racehorse.

The light harness enthusiast loves the unhoppled trotter, and a feast was provided in the great display given by Sea Gift, a mare who, by the sheer merit of her performances on the track, has risen from the maiden class to be now regarded as one of the best ever seen at Addington. Her finish in the Dominion Handicap was a remarkable one and the speed she exhibited over the later stages when apparently in a hopeless position had the crowd in a fever of excitement. Her win was a popular one, but not nearly as popular as it would have been had some of her earlier performances been more consistent.

It is a pity the track was not in order for Todd Lonzia to show his paces, for this horse was plainly all at sea on the tricky course and could not control his balance or speed for any distance.

The trotters and pacers of today are better than ever before, and especially pleasing is the great improvement made in the ranks of the trotters.

A most interesting race on the programme was the Riccarton Stakes, for maiden three-year-olds, and while Double Great won very comfortably, the race served to show a number of very promising youngsters who stood at the barrier like experienced race-horses and displayed the excellent training they had gone through.

The day's racing concluded with a most exciting finish in the Hagley Handicap, and only the judge could correctly place the leading horses, who flashed past the post almost in line.

-o0o-

THE PRESS 15 Nov 1935

DERBY DAY AT ADDINGTON

The racing at Addington yesterday provided as varied a programme as has been offered for many a day, and the uneven state of the track presented a problem that demanded the closest study by drivers. In the early part of the day the extreme outside provided the only good footing for horses, and as the afternoon wore on the course improved towards the centre, while in the closing stages the application of light harrows made a surface on which something like real speed could be shown.

The Addington course yesterday presented a problem. drivers with reputations for astuteness quite failed to realise the pitfalls of tricky going, and they failed rather badly while others enjoyed all the benefits. In the earlier contests division races seemed to be the order of the day, one section racing on the inside on heavy going and taking the shortest way to the winning post, while others preferred the more reliable footing on the outside of the course. The longest way round sometimes proved the shortest way home, and it was noticeable that horses were quickly slowed up when they attempted the inside going. Had the track been in good order from the start it is possible that several records would have been broken.

Indianapolis proved the star turn when he won the Clakson Memorial, a race named after the well-known sportsman and very live figure in framing the programmes for the Metropolitan Trotting Club.

Indianapolis was set to give away 48 yards in a mile race, and with the field racing well out from the rails he appeared to be set an impossible task. Harold Logan was on 72 yards behind, but before two furlongs had been covered he was in a nice position, just behind the big pacer. The latter, with a phenomenal burst of speed, left the little gelding well behind, and he carried on a sensational run round his field to win as he liked in 2min 9 1/5sec, which under the conditions was one of the greatest performances ever witnessed in New Zealand. Indianapolis is the pacer of the hour, a fine-mannered stallion who may be still further improved by the experience he will receive in his racing.

Not less impressive were the great performances of Sea Gift and Nell Volo in the Sockburn Handicap, yet both were defeated by First Wrack, who was admirably handled by M Holmes and came home in the manner of a true and tried racehorse. Had the track been in good order Sea Gift would probably have won in the fastest time registered by a trotter in New Zealand, but extra distance and the fortunes of the race told the inevitable tale.

The New Zealand Derby Stakes, the Blue Riband of the Dominion, was a race worthy of the occasion, and while Double Great won on his merits and proved himself a regular son of Great Bingen, one of the best horses of all times, there were others in Frisco Lady, Gaillard, and Casanova who contested with him a very serious race. As in the other races the state of the course was something to be reckoned with.

An ill-founded rumour circulated on Wednesday affected the attendance and the peculiar nature of the course naturally discouraged speculation, and to these two causes may be attributed a drop in the totalisator investments from 27,528 last year to 25,619 10s. The racing has not been better at any previous meeting, the management of the club staff and honorary officials was right up to standard, and generally the whole day's racing gave promise of great sport today.

-o0o-

THE PRESS 16 Nov 1935

BATTLE ROYAL BETWEEN FOUR-YEAR-OLDS

In the history of trotting at Addington it is doubtful whether any better sport has been witnessed than was provided yesterday. The weather, which had not been favourable on the two previous days, was ideal for light harness racing, and the attendance was reminiscent of show days of years ago. The track, which on the first two days was very heavy, was at its best for the sport, but, having receiveda thorough soaking, it was not so fast as on some previous occasions, and a strong easterly wind did not help in fast time making. The finishes were as close and the racing as exciting as the big crowd could have wished, and the perfomances of a number of horses were exceptional.

In the principal event of the day, the Ollivier Memorial Handicap, the battle for four-year-old supremacy took place between Gamble and Graham Direct, and the public was treated to a battle royal over the last furlong between horses possibly the best of their age raced in New Zealand. It was a stirring contest, and long before the horses reached the straight, the excitement was intense. Great horses driven by expert reinsmen provided a test of gameness and stamina not often witnessed on a racecourse. Gamble won. In victory he proved himself a super horse, and in defeat Graham Direct showed the true fighting qualities of the standardbred pacer.

The true test of the Dominion's champions was provided in the Free-For-All in which there were only six starter - the best six that could be produced. Harold Logan who has reigned as the recognised champion, had his colours lowered by possibly the best pacer New Zealand has seen in Indianapolis, a horse with a record of 2min 1 2/5sec for a mile. It was not an easy victory fro Harold Logan, beginning smartly, contested every inch of the long journey down the final stretch. He was beaten and beaten out of a place, but it was only in the last 100 yards that he found age and hard racing telling on him, and he faded in the challenge by the younger horses. Harold Logan was not disgraced. He did everything a good horse should do, but he met a great horse that not only matched him for speed but showed better staying powers.

The real treat of the afternoon was provided by the unhoppled trotters in the Middleton Handicap, and Sea Gift's performance in covering two miles in 4min 24 3/5sec, better time than any pacer had registered at the meeting was one of the highlights of trotting. She was beaten into second place by another fine trotter in First Wrack, but while the latter had all the advantages of good pace-making and a handy position in the field, Sea Gift, from 84 yards behind, was forced to cover a lot of extra ground to get round the field that was well bunched from the start. What Sea Gift's performance meant can hardly be imagined, but it was possibly the greatest exhibition of trotting every witnessed at Addington. At no stage of the race was she within 15 feet of the rails and this, in a contest over two miles on a six furlong track, is a very severe handicap.

Flotsam defeated Airflow in the opening race after a fine display in fast time. Recess proved a good game pacer by winning the Sprinter's Handicap from a bunched field after she had had to concede a start over the last quarter mile. Grand Mogul showed stamina when he led all the way to win the Australasian Handicap. Bingen Palm, who comes from Westport, scored a popular victory in the Hornby Handicap after a sterling performance, and Rey Spec's victory in the Lyttleton Handicap may be credited to the expert reinsmanship of M Holmes.

The track, which was in splendid order, was a credit to the custodian, Mr J Highsted; the starting, which was in the hands of Mr A J Hastings, was excellently done; and altogether staff and hohorary officials helped to provide an excellent day of entertainment.

The totalisator investments, which on the two previous days had shown a decrease on last years figures, went up from 39,428 10s last year to 40,984 10s, an increase of 1556. The wet weather on the first two days was the chief cause of a substantial drop in the investments for the meeting.


Credit: THE PRESS 13 Nov 1935

RACING HISTORY FEATURE RACE COMMENT

1935 MIDDLETON HANDICAP

400 sovs: Two miles: Unhoppled Trotters: Wnr 4min 28 2/5sec

The Middleton Handicap produced another splendid exhibition of trotting and Sea Gift, after establishing the fastest time of the meeting for two miles, 4min 24 3/5sec, was beaten in a fine finish by the Durbar Lodge mare First Wrack.

Raclaim took up the early running from Fifa, New Metford, and Norma Bingen, and already in a nice position were First Wrack, Raima, and Bessie Parrish, while Nell Volo was tucked in on the rails and Sea Gift was doing her brilliant work several sulkies out from the rails.

When the last round was commenced Raclaim and New Metford were in front of First Wrack, Bessie Parrish, Stanley T (who had made a fast run), Raima, Nell Volo and Sea Gift.

In the straight New Metford, Raima, and First Wrack were almost on terms, while Sea Gift was some distance away. First Wrack then assued the lead and Sea Gift commenced a brilliant effort. First Wrack reached the post first, but she was all out and Sea Gift was gaining at every stride. Raima, Great Way, New Metford and Bessie Parrish followed the placed horses.

First Wrack had won the Sockburn Handicap on the second day after a fine exhibition, and, on this occasion the reinsmanship of M Holmes brought victory. He covered no extra ground and took full advantage of the fine pacemaking provided.

Sea Gift in defeat was subjected to a very severe test, for she covered much extra ground and registered 4min 24 3/5sec for the two miles. Raima trotted very solidly from start to finish, his best performance for a long time, and New Metford, Bessie Parrish and Great Way were always in the firing line.

Nell Volo had every chance and covered no extra ground, but a bad break in the straight spoiled her chance. The American-bred mare may not be quite at her best.

Credit: THE PRESS: 16 Nov 1935

RACING HISTORY FEATURE RACE COMMENT

1935 SOCKBURN HANDICAP

350 sovs: One mile & a half: Wnrs time 3min 25sec

The Sockburn Handicap provided a brilliant exhibition of trotting and a well deserved win for the Durbar Lodge mare First Wrack, whose 3min 25sec for a mile and a half under the conditions was a fine effort.

Don Chenault, Teviot Downs and Raclaim made the very early running and with a round to go the first-named pair were still in front, while Lough Guy and First Wrack, were in behind, followed by Fifa, Norma Bingen, Sea Gift(72 yds) and Nell Volo(48 yds). The last-named pair were trotting brilliantly, and three furlongs from home Sea Gift appeared likely to take a hand in the finish. Nell Volo tried a run on the rails, but the going troubled her, and First Wrack(24 yds), went away to win in very impressive style from Norma Bingen, who had too much speed for Nell Volo over the final stages.

First Wrack won like a true racehorse and was entitled to the honours, but Sea Gift's first mile was one of the greatest displays of trotting ever witnessed at Addington. She covered a lot of extra ground, trotting in fine style, and had passed the majority with half the journey covered. Bessie Parrish was solid all through, but the brilliance of the others was too much for her. After her early effort, Sea Gift attempted to make a run on the inside, and in this respect a mistake was made. The mare was trotting great guns on the outside, and kept there she would have caused trouble. Teviot Downs trotted a mile and little more. Nell Volo may be a much better mare in her race today. Norma Bingen showed speed over the concluding stages. It was her best effort to date.

Credit: THE PRESS 15 Nov 1935

RACING HISTORY FEATURE RACE COMMENT

JACK FRASER Jnr - INDIANAPOLIS

Stable driver for trainer, Claude Dunleavy, Fraser drove a tactically brilliant race to win the horses second Cup off 40 metres.

His highly touted young rival, War Buoy, was proven at 3200m and went six lengths clear on the turn in the wet conditions he loved. It looked curtains for the champ. But a super cool Fraser waited back in the field and then drove to be widest on the home turn where the old clay track was firmest on a damp day.

From six lengths behind and off the track, Indianapolis won by a staggering three lengths. What a horse he was.

In his historic third win from 40m it had rained also and Fraser kept a weather eye out for the dangerous War Bouy and James Bryce's Red Shadow. Bryce drove a mighty race making a run for it at the 600m and Fraser was the only one on alert. Even so it was a terrific battle up the straight, one of the great Cups.

TRIVIA FACT: Fraser later took over the famous stables at Addington but lost his licence for several years for taking advantage of an owner. He later assisted at Roydon Lodge in the George Noble era, still a bit grumpy but a veteran who had been there, done that.

Credit: David McCarthy writing in Harnessed Oct 2016

RESULTS OF PRESTIGE RACES FOR THIS SEASON
 
NEW BRIGHTON HANDICAP (NBTC)

Current Sponsor:
1904-09 2 Miles: 1910-11 1 1/2 Miles Re-named Brooklyn Hcp: 1912-28 2 Miles: 1929-35 Not Run: 1936-38 1 1/2 Miles: 1939-44 Not Run: 1945 2 Miles: 1946 1 5/8 Miles: 1947-49 2 Miles: Race Discontinued 1950
Raced between 1904 and 1949
Year: 1935

 
Race History
WINNER Not Run  
TRAINER DRIVER TIME
HANDICAP STAKE DATE 4/12/1936
BREEDING
OWNER
HENRY MACE MEMORIAL

Current Sponsor:
2 miles 1902-31: 1 1/4 miles 1932: 2 miles 1933-38: 9 1/2 furlongs 1939: Not Run 1940-47: 2 miles 1948-57: 1 1/2 miles 1958: 2 miles 1959-60: 1 1/2 miles 1961-62
Handicap Pace: Run between 1902 & 1962
Year: 1935

 
Race History
WINNER GUNMETAL  
TRAINER C S Donald DRIVER C S Donald TIME 4 31.0
HANDICAP Front STAKE 200 DATE 1/12/1935
BREEDING 6g Man O'War- Irelands mare
OWNER C S Donald
SPRINTERS HANDICAP

Current Sponsor:
1922-34 1 Mile: 1935 1 1/4 Miles: 1936-37 1 1/2 Miles. Formerly called the Recovery Handicap
Handicap Pace. Run from 1922 to 1937
Year: 1935

 
Race History
WINNER RECESS  
TRAINER L Davidson DRIVER J Bryce Jnr TIME 2 46 1/5
HANDICAP 12 yards STAKE 250 DATE 15/11/1935
BREEDING 6m Rey De Oro-Dollar Princess
OWNER J Westerman
OLLIVIER HCP

Current Sponsor:
1935-49 Run as Handicap: 1950 Not Run: 1951-53 Two Mile FFA: 1954-55 One Mile & Half FFA: 1956 Two Mile Hcp: 1957-63 One Mile & Five Furlong Hcp: 1964-65 One Mile & Quarter Hcp: 1966-72 One Mile & Five Furlong Hcp: 1973-74 2000 Metres Hcp: 1975-76 1 Mile Mobile FFA: 1977-79 1 Mile Mobile Restricted FFA: Last run 1979
Year: 1935

 
Race History
WINNER GAMBLE  
TRAINER M B Edwards DRIVER S A Edwards TIME 4 26 2/5
HANDICAP Scr STAKE 750 sovs DATE 15/11/1935
BREEDING 4h Jack Potts-Princess Ann
OWNER T C Butcher
NEW ZEALAND FREE-FOR-ALL

Current Sponsor: ( WOODLANDS )
(Renamed New Zealand Pacing Sprint Championship, 1942-48) 1914-1919 One Mile & Quarter: 1920-1927 One Mile: 1928-1961 One Mile & Quarter: 1962 Nine & Half Furlongs Mobile: 1963-1972 One Mile & Quarter Stand: 1973-1974 2000 Metres Stand: 1975-2011 2000 Metres Mobile: 2012-2013 1 Mile Mobile: 2014 1950 Metres Mobile
1982 on GROUP 1: 1950Metres: Mobile Start.
Year: 1935

 
Race History
WINNER INDIANAPOLIS  
TRAINER F C Dunleavy DRIVER J Fraser jnr TIME 2 39 2/5
HANDICAP Scr STAKE 400 sovs DATE 15/11/1935
BREEDING h Wrack-Estella Amos
OWNER G J Barton
Last 800 Last 400 MileRate 2 07 3/5
MIDDLETON HANDICAP TROT

Current Sponsor:
Standing Start: 1903-1911 race open to pacers & trotters: 1911 in saddle. 2m 1902-3: 1 1/2m 1904: 2m 1905: 1 1/2m 1906-7: 2m 1908-30: 1 1/2m 1931-3: 2m 1934-38: 1 1/2m 1939: 2m 1940. Final running 1940
Year: 1935

 
Race History
WINNER FIRST WRACK  
TRAINER G Mouritz DRIVER M F Holmes TIME 4 28 2/5
HANDICAP 36 yards STAKE 400 DATE 15/11/1935
BREEDING 10m Wrack-Pearlchild
OWNER Durbar Lodge
LOUISSON HANDICAP

Current Sponsor:
Handicap Pace: Standing Start: 2 miles 1935-38: 1 1/2 miles 1939-40: Not Run 1941-1947: 2 miles 1948-50: 1 mile & 5 furlongs 1951-72: 2600 metres 1973-86
Standing Start Handicap Pace run from 1935 to 1940 then 1948 to 1986
Year: 1935

 
Race History
WINNER WAR BOUY  
TRAINER M B Edwards DRIVER S A Edwards TIME 4 39 4/5
HANDICAP 12 yards STAKE 800 DATE 14/11/1935
BREEDING 5g Man O'War-Little Kewpie
OWNER Mrs E K Mauger
SOCKBURN HANDICAP TROT

Current Sponsor:
Standing Start. 1903 2miles; 1904-5 1 1/2 miles; 1906 2miles; 1907 1 1/2 miles; 1908-33 2miles; 1934-40 1 1/2 miles; 1941-46 1mile 5furlongs; 1947-50 1 1/4 miles stand FFA.
1903-1946: 1947-1950 Run as Sockburn FFA Trot
Year: 1935

 
Race History
WINNER FIRST WRACK  
TRAINER G Mouritz DRIVER M F Holmes TIME 3 25
HANDICAP 24 yards STAKE 350 DATE 14/11/1935
BREEDING 10m Wrack-Pearlchild
OWNER Durbar Lodge
NEW ZEALAND DERBY

Current Sponsor: ( DIAMOND CREEK FARM )
(Formerly New Brighton Derby Stakes) From 1914 to 1925 the race was conducted by the New Brighton Trotting Cub and decided in the Autumn (1925 Winner: Kohara). In 1925 it was taken over by the Metropolitan Trotting Club and decided in the Spring (Winner: Native Chief). 1982 decided in Summer. = Dead Heat. 1968-9 1 mile & half: 1970-2 1m 5f: 1973-83 2600 Metres Stand: From 1984 2600 Metres Mobile.
GROUP 1:Three-year-old Pace: 2600 Metres: Mobile Start.
Year: 1935

 
Race History
WINNER DOUBLE GREAT  
TRAINER R Dunn DRIVER J Bryce jnr TIME 3 44.0
HANDICAP Scr STAKE 500 DATE 14/11/1935
BREEDING 3c Great Bingen-Great Actress
OWNER J R McKenzie
METROPOLITAN CHALLENGE STAKES

Current Sponsor:
2 miles 1901-4: 1 1/2 miles 1905-23: Not Run 1906: 2 miles 1924-36: 1 1/4 miles 1937-39: 1m 5f 1940: 2 miles 1941-42: 1 1/4 miles 1943: 1m 5f 1944-45: 1 1/4 miles 1946-63: 1m 5f 1964. From 1943 to 1963 restricted to 3&4yos: 1964 4yos only: Last run 1964
Handicap Pace: Run from 1901 to 1964: Open to 1942: For 3 & 4 yos 1943-63: 4 yos only 1964
Year: 1935

 
Race History
WINNER KING'S WARRIOR  
TRAINER F J Smith DRIVER F J Smith TIME 4 38 2/5
HANDICAP Front STAKE 300 DATE 14/11/1935
BREEDING 4g Blue Mountain King-Forward Lady
OWNER W L Lincoln
DOMINION TROTTING FFA

Current Sponsor: ( HARAS des TROTTEURS )
1911-1973 Distance Two Miles: 1934&1935 Distance One & Half Miles: = Dead Heat 2007- Free-For-All
GROUP 1: For Trotting Horses only 3200 metres
Year: 1935

 
Race History
WINNER SEA GIFT  
TRAINER E J Smith DRIVER E J Smith TIME 3 34 2/5
HANDICAP 36 Yards STAKE 600 DATE 12/11/1935
BREEDING m Wrack-Pearl Huon mare
OWNER C M Archer & McFarlane
NEW ZEALAND TROTTING CUP

Current Sponsor: ( CHRISTCHURCH CASINO )
1904-1973 Two Miles: From 1929 to 1931 run as two Heats and a Final: 2008 Free-For-All
GROUP 1: 3200 Metres: Standing Start
Year: 1935

 
Race History
WINNER INDIANAPOLIS  
TRAINER F C Dunleavy DRIVER J Fraser jnr TIME 4 44.0
HANDICAP 48 Yards STAKE 1500 DATE 12/11/1935
BREEDING 6 h Wrack - Estella Amos
OWNER G J Barton
Last 800 Last 400 MileRate 2 22.0
RICCARTON STAKES

Current Sponsor:
1 1/2 miles 1935: 1 1/4 miles 1936-63: 1 1/2 miles 1964-71: 1 1/4 miles 1972: 2600 metres 1973-77. From 1964 run as seperate races on Tuesday & Friday of Cup Week
3yo Handicap Pace: Between 1964 & 1977 run as two races: Run from 1935 to 1977
Year: 1935

 
Race History
WINNER DOUBLE GREAT  
TRAINER R Dunn DRIVER J Bryce Jnr TIME 3 38.0
HANDICAP Front STAKE 250 DATE 11/11/1935
BREEDING g Great Bingen-Great Actress
OWNER J R McKenzie
LIGHTNING HANDICAP

Current Sponsor:
Standing Start: 1mile 1904-18; 1 1/2miles 1919; 1mile 1920-31; 1 1/2miles 1932-36; 1 1/4miles 1937; 1 1/2miles 1938-40; 2miles 1941; Not run 1942; 1 1/4miles 1943-61; 9 1/2furlongs 1962; 1 1/4miles 1963-72; Not run 1973&4; 2000metres 1975-82. In saddle 1904, 1909-11, 1920-31. Run as FFA 1947, 52, 59, 62, 63 & 1965
From 1904 to 1982
Year: 1935

 
Race History
WINNER SUPERTAX  
TRAINER T Leadbetter DRIVER J B Pringle TIME 3 19 2/5
HANDICAP Front STAKE 200 DATE 16/08/1935
BREEDING 5h Maxegin-Grace Logan
OWNER P Walter
NATIONAL HCP

Current Sponsor:
1904-40 2 mile Std: 1941 1m Std: 1942-50 2m Std: 1951-56 1m 5furlong Std: 1957 2m Std: 1958-59 1m5f Std: 1960-61 2m Std: 1962-72 1m5f Std: 1973-81 2600mtrs Std: 1982 Race Discontinued
Handicap Pace. Last run 1981
Year: 1935

 
Race History
WINNER WILD GUY  
TRAINER D Rodgers DRIVER G Mouritz TIME 4 21 1/5
HANDICAP Front STAKE 600 DATE 16/08/1935
BREEDING 9g Guy Parrish-Wild Moness
OWNER D Rodgers
KING GEORGE (AUGUST) HANDICAP

Current Sponsor:
2 Mile Handicap Pace. 1917-18 & 1936 Not Run: Race discontinued 1938
2 Mile: Handicap Pace
Year: 1935

 
Race History
WINNER TEMPEST  
TRAINER F C Dunlevey DRIVER J Fraser Jnr TIME 4 23 4/5
HANDICAP Front STAKE 500 DATE 14/08/1935
BREEDING 7m Wrack-Nell Pointer
OWNER G J Barton
AVON HANDICAP

Current Sponsor:
1904-06 1 Mile: 1907-33 2 Miles: 1917-18 Not Run: 1934-36 1 1/2 Miles: 1937 2 Miles: 1938 1 1/4 Miles: 1939-40 1 1/2 Miles: 1941-44 2 Miles: 1942 & 1943 Not Run: 1945-49 1 1/4 Miles.
Run from 1904 to 1949
Year: 1935

 
Race History
WINNER TODD LONZIA  
TRAINER J Henderson DRIVER D C Watts TIME 3 16 1/5
HANDICAP 72 yards STAKE 250 DATE 14/08/1935
BREEDING 8h Lorenes Todd-Daphne Dean
OWNER A H Todd
INTERNATIONAL (SPRING) HANDICAP

Current Sponsor:
1906-1919 1 miles: 1920-1935 1mile: 1936-1940 1 miles: Race discontinued 1941
Handicap Pace
Year: 1935

 
Race History
WINNER SURE  
TRAINER S A Edwards DRIVER S A Edwards TIME 2 09 1/5
HANDICAP Front STAKE 250 DATE 10/08/1935
BREEDING 7m Peter Chenault-Our Nurse
OWNER Mrs W Mackenzie
KING GEORGE HANDICAP

Current Sponsor:
2 Mile Handicap
2 Mile Handicap Pace run from 1912 to 1935
Year: 1935

 
Race History
WINNER TEMPEST  
TRAINER F C Dunlevey DRIVER J Fraser Jnr TIME 4 25 3/5
HANDICAP 12 yards STAKE 350 DATE 3/06/1935
BREEDING 7m Wrack-Nell Pointer
OWNER G J Barton
PAPARUA HANDICAP PACE

Current Sponsor:
1919-38 2 Miles: 1939-40 1 1/2 Miles: 1941-42 2 Miles
Handicap Pace Run from 1919 to 1942
Year: 1935

 
Race History
WINNER TAXPAYER  
TRAINER R Dunn DRIVER P Gallagher TIME 4 41 2/5
HANDICAP 12 yards STAKE 350 DATE 1/06/1935
BREEDING 5h Great Bingen-Nyallo
OWNER J R McKenzie
Last 800 Last 400 MileRate 2 20 4/5
NZ HAMBLETONIAN HCP TROT

Current Sponsor:
1 1/4 Miles 1934-1940: 1 5/8 Miles 1941-1942: Two Miles 1943-44: 1 1/4 Miles 1945-49: Two Miles 1954: One Mile & 5 Furlongs 1955: Two Miles 1956-1965: From 1934-1949 TOP CLASS TROT: 1938 & 1951 Not Run: 1950-65 NZ HAMBLETONIAN HCP TROT: Replaced by NZ TROTTING CHAMPIONSHIP 1966
Two Miles Invitation Hcp Trot
Year: 1935

 
Race History
WINNER TRAMPFAST  
TRAINER R B Berry DRIVER R B Berry TIME 3 17.2
HANDICAP 72 yards STAKE 300 DATE 24/04/1935
BREEDING Logan Pointer-Rennies Galindo mare
OWNER W T Lowe
PRESIDENTS HANDICAP (NZMTC)

Current Sponsor:
1904 2 miles: 1905 1 1/2 miles: 1906-10 2 miles: 1911 1 1/2 miles: 1912-40 2 miles: 1938 & 1942-45 & 1948-49 & 1951 Not Run: 1941-47 1 5/8 miles: 1950-54 2 miles: 1955-63 1 5/8 miles: 1964-65 1 1/4 miles: 1966-68 1 5/8 miles.
Handicap Pace. Run from 1904 to 1968
Year: 1935

 
Race History
WINNER MOUNTAIN DELL  
TRAINER F C Dunlevey DRIVER D C Watts TIME 4 29 3/5
HANDICAP 36 yards STAKE 500 DATE 24/04/1935
BREEDING 9m Blue Mountain King-Whispering Dell
OWNER G J Barton
EASTER CUP

Current Sponsor: ( BRECKON FARMS & ALL STARS RACING )
Prior to 1939 Easter Hcp Two Miles: 1918 & 1938 Not Run: 1940 1 1/2 miles: 1942-1946 Two Miles: 1947 & 48 Easter Stakes FFA One Mile & Half: 1949-50 Easter Hcp: 1951 Not Run: 1952-1970 One Mile & Five Furlongs: 1972-1973 Two Miles: 1983 GROUP 2:
GROUP 1: Pace: 3200 Metres: Standing Start
Year: 1935

 
Race History
WINNER SUNNY MORN=  
TRAINER O E Hooper DRIVER O E Hooper TIME 4 18 1/5
HANDICAP 24 yards STAKE 500 DATE 20/04/1935
BREEDING 9g Sungod-Fourpence
OWNER F E Sutton
EASTER CUP

Current Sponsor: ( BRECKON FARMS & ALL STARS RACING )
Prior to 1939 Easter Hcp Two Miles: 1918 & 1938 Not Run: 1940 1 1/2 miles: 1942-1946 Two Miles: 1947 & 48 Easter Stakes FFA One Mile & Half: 1949-50 Easter Hcp: 1951 Not Run: 1952-1970 One Mile & Five Furlongs: 1972-1973 Two Miles: 1983 GROUP 2:
GROUP 1: Pace: 3200 Metres: Standing Start
Year: 1935

 
Race History
WINNER WILD GUY=  
TRAINER D Rodgers DRIVER G Mouritz TIME 4 20 2/5
HANDICAP Front STAKE 500 DATE 20/04/1935
BREEDING 9g Guy Parrish-Wild Moness
OWNER D Rodgers
DENTON MEMORIAL

Current Sponsor:
2 Miles Handicap Pace
2 Miles Hcp Pace run from 1930-1939
Year: 1935

 
Race History
WINNER REY SPEC  
TRAINER J E McBride DRIVER E C McDermott TIME 4 28 3/5
HANDICAP 36 yards STAKE 250 DATE 23/02/1935
BREEDING 5g Rey De Oro-Logan Spec
OWNER J E McBride
Last 800 Last 400 MileRate 2 14 2/5
MASON HANDICAP PACE (CPTC)

Current Sponsor:
1933-41 2 Miles Std: 1942-46 1 5/8 Miles: 1947 1 1/2 Miles: 1948-52 1 5/8 Miles: 1953 2 Miles: 1954-56 1 5/8 Miles.
Handicap Pace run from 1933 to 1956
Year: 1935

 
Race History
WINNER ELVO  
TRAINER R A Bebbington DRIVER R A Bebbington TIME 4 25.0
HANDICAP Front STAKE 350 DATE 2/01/1935
BREEDING 11m Oinako-Elveno
OWNER R A Bebbington
STEWARDS HANDICAP/ MILE (CPTC)

Current Sponsor:
1910 1 1/2 Miles: 1911-41 2 Miles: 1942-48 1 5/8 Miles: 1949-52 2 Miles: 1951 Not Run: 1953-63 1 5/8 Miles: 1964 1 1/4 Miles: 1965 1 5/8 Miles: 1966 1 1/4 Miles: 1967-81 1 Mile Mobile
Trotting Handicap/Mile: Run from 1910 to 1981 by Canterbury Park
Year: 1935

 
Race History
WINNER FAIRYLAND  
TRAINER J J Kennerley DRIVER E N Kennerley TIME 4 52 3/5
HANDICAP Front STAKE 165 DATE 1/01/1935
BREEDING 9m Guy Parrish-Dream Land
OWNER W Shields
CANTERBURY HANDICAP (CPTC)

Current Sponsor:
1911-1945 2 Miles: 1947-58 1 5/8 Miles
Raced between 1911 and 1958
Year: 1935

 
Race History
WINNER MASTER ROY  
TRAINER O E Hooper DRIVER O E Hooper TIME 4 50 4/5
HANDICAP Front STAKE 400 DATE 1/01/1935
BREEDING 10h Waverley-Queens Drive
OWNER B Grice
CRAVEN HANDICAP PACE

Current Sponsor:
1919-42 1 1/4 Miles: 1935 & 1938 Not Run: 1943-49 2 Miles
Handicap Pace Run from 1919 to 1949
Year: 1935

 
Race History
WINNER Not Run  
TRAINER DRIVER TIME
HANDICAP STAKE DATE 2/02/1934
BREEDING
OWNER


In the event that you cannot find the information you require from the contents, please contact Colin Steele in the Racing Department at Addington Raceway.
Phone (03) 338 9094